Will math improve my logical thinking?

Not really.

It cannot hurt…but, the logic aspect is a bit different.

With math, you can check to see if the answer is right, and, try something else if it doesn't check, etc. You can do a proof, etc.

With logic, the basic problem is that the brain evolved to take short cuts, as brains are very expensive in calories and nutrients, and, starvation is the most common cause of extinction.

:D

So, we are HARDWIRED to make certain types of mistakes.

Basically, things that “make sense”, and sound “right”, can be wrong, and, wrong in the same way, for the same reasons, because when were were evolving, it did

Not really.

It cannot hurt…but, the logic aspect is a bit different.

With math, you can check to see if the answer is right, and, try something else if it doesn't check, etc. You can do a proof, etc.

With logic, the basic problem is that the brain evolved to take short cuts, as brains are very expensive in calories and nutrients, and, starvation is the most common cause of extinction.

:D

So, we are HARDWIRED to make certain types of mistakes.

Basically, things that “make sense”, and sound “right”, can be wrong, and, wrong in the same way, for the same reasons, because when were were evolving, it didn't matter yet.

This is why optical illusions work at all, for example…we KNOW the types of mistakes the brain makes, and, we can trick it into making them.

So, that’s just a visual example, but, the principle applies to arguments, etc, as well.

So, “learning logic” is less about learning to think, as about learning how NOT TO think… and learning what mistakes our brain WILL make, if we don't reel it in.

Think of it as proactive thinking…LOOKING for the booby traps, by learning what they look and sound like, their properties, etc, so, you can recognize them in any environment.

That means when others present an argument, (Which can be a TV commercial/sale pitch/religious pitch or an editorial or the news, a philosophical argument, etc..)…you are scanning it for booby traps…the things the brain will latch onto and fall for, etc.

It also means scanning what YOU say, for the same thing, to avoid SAYING them too.

:D

Some common examples include confusing causation and correlation, and sunk cost errors, etc.

If you are NOT aware of these sorts of things, they will convince you of things without merit…or, you will say things without merit.

So, a logic class, for example, teaches you the types of errors, or fallacies, and, warns you to be on the lookout.

APPLYING that mental rigor to you life is actually not that easy at first…its easy to let your guard down… but, as it becomes habit, and you drop the human tendency to take the short cuts… you find that many things suddenly become quite clear, and, you can cut through the BS and get to the heart of an issue.

So, math is related to all of this, but, not in the way that you were thinking.

The main way, is that math has its own rules, and, ways of checking your work… but they are not the same rules, or ways, as logic has.

:D

The primary purpose of Maths is to study and understand abstract patterns. When you “learn” Maths, you are connecting concepts and using your own reasoning to construct new ones.

Since all mathematical patterns are subject to logic, studying and learning about patterns in Maths will indeed have some effect on your overall logical thinking abilities.

However, the human brain itself has many components, and each component results in different types of reasoning. Different Maths subjects have different effects on those components. For example, studying and understanding Geometry affects visual reas

The primary purpose of Maths is to study and understand abstract patterns. When you “learn” Maths, you are connecting concepts and using your own reasoning to construct new ones.

Since all mathematical patterns are subject to logic, studying and learning about patterns in Maths will indeed have some effect on your overall logical thinking abilities.

However, the human brain itself has many components, and each component results in different types of reasoning. Different Maths subjects have different effects on those components. For example, studying and understanding Geometry affects visual reasoning.

If you’d like an area that is more suited to an eventual skill, research the skill and find an area of Maths that can be connected to that skill. If you’d like to improve general logic abilities, then try a more general field of Maths. “Core” fields like Set-Theory tend to be more broad and generalized.

Math can help improve a lot of things such as critical thinking, quick thinking, handling more difficult situations, and of course logical thinking. Since all mathematical patterns are subject to logic, studying and learning about patterns in Maths will indeed have some effect on your overall logical thinking abilities. For example, studying and understanding Geometry can help improve visual reasoning. Studying certain objects such as circles or squares and their features such as their area or volumes can help increase your knowledge about them, therefore, making it seem more logical to think

Math can help improve a lot of things such as critical thinking, quick thinking, handling more difficult situations, and of course logical thinking. Since all mathematical patterns are subject to logic, studying and learning about patterns in Maths will indeed have some effect on your overall logical thinking abilities. For example, studying and understanding Geometry can help improve visual reasoning. Studying certain objects such as circles or squares and their features such as their area or volumes can help increase your knowledge about them, therefore, making it seem more logical to think about when handling situations involving objects like these. Math can help in a lot of things.

When I attended university in California, Logic was a class offered only by the philosophy department. My major was mathematics, but I took Logic as an elective.

The quickest and most thorough way to learn logic is to study it directly. Mathematics is a very long road, and though it includes logic, mathematics courses don’t delve very deeply into the subject.

But yes, math will improve your logical thinking.

What do you mean with learning math ?

If you think about studying it that is quite a big decision. You don’t do that just to improve logical thinking but for the math.

But, yes studying mathematics is by far the best thing to train logic thinking. Far superior to courses like philosophy.

That is simply because logic is a core part of mathematics and needed for everything. And that will also have an effect to daily life.

But you can get much more out of mathematics and I suspect you don’t even really know what mathematicians do.

It will help make problems seem solvable.

With math equations or trigonometry, there are surprises and variables that can always be introduced or excluded to make a functional solution to any problem. This can be applied to your life, little problems or big.

Like it or not, math is there, I think getting to know the subject if it seems intimidating could be knowing that it can be learnt and pose less of a fear. Besides, any analytical problem career wise will always present itself. Mathematically conducting the problem will oversee the problem in big picture.

Mathematics is a wonderful blend of intuition and logic. Intuition primarily suggests answers or techniques and logic fills in the blanks. So yes, if done diligently, math helps to develop logic skills. Another area the math promotes in concise and sometimes terse writing. In fact there are math law firms who hire mathematicians to write documents in a clearer way the a party of the third part etc.

Not exactly.

It might, it might not.

It depends on your mindset, the purpose you learn and how you learn to understand the applications of it. Then one day you may use this learned skill to overcome your problem(s).

Maybe you just plainly learn it for your exam or anything else but do not apply the knowledge, then you might not improve your logical thinking.

I have a friend who was very good at maths but wasn’t quite a good thinker, logically.

Algebra can be foundational for serious logic.

Calculus (if you learn it) can be foundational for serious reasoning.

Some kinds of math like graph theory help with computer programming.

Statistics is important for science, business, and economics.

Generally every form of math has some type of application.

It's not a coincidence that physicists are good at math.

I think so. Logic is the basis for arithmetic and logical thinking is involved in the study of math. Learning basic logical forms--along with your study of math would be even better.

Studying math problems may only be a precursor to learning logical thinking. So it depends. I mean, practicing easy arithmetic won’t help at all unless you do the math thing and generalize. But the suggested exercise is a reasonable idea.