Why do people think they are not intelligent?

Those who do think that way could be because…

  • They set expectations upon themselves they cannot meet. blaming their alleged lack of intelligence for it
  • They compare themselves to others that are more intelligent/successful (from their POV)/ whatever, they attribute those people having “a better life” according to them thanks to a higher intelligence, and think they can’t have the same because what they lack is intelligence
  • They compare themselves to themselves in the past, and they feel dumber, slower, more inadequate.
  • People tell them they are not repeatedly, and they internalize that. It can be

Those who do think that way could be because…

  • They set expectations upon themselves they cannot meet. blaming their alleged lack of intelligence for it
  • They compare themselves to others that are more intelligent/successful (from their POV)/ whatever, they attribute those people having “a better life” according to them thanks to a higher intelligence, and think they can’t have the same because what they lack is intelligence
  • They compare themselves to themselves in the past, and they feel dumber, slower, more inadequate.
  • People tell them they are not repeatedly, and they internalize that. It can be worse if those feeding such niceties to them are close ones.

they haven’t worked to their full potential so it always seems like everyone is better than them, causing them to think that they aren’t as smart. Or traumatic experiences where people call them dumb or stupid

If you are asking because you are trying to figure this out for yourself, here’s my story.

I don’t think I’m intelligent. I know I’m intelligent. I’ve known it since I was very young. Adults exclaimed over my ability to read before I started school. I remember a grandparent going on and on about me sitting in his lap and reading the newspaper to him when I was a toddler. I don’t actually remember learning how to read. In first grade the teacher would give us stars on a chart for every book we read and at the end of the year we would get a candy bar for every star. Kids took home between 1 to 5

If you are asking because you are trying to figure this out for yourself, here’s my story.

I don’t think I’m intelligent. I know I’m intelligent. I’ve known it since I was very young. Adults exclaimed over my ability to read before I started school. I remember a grandparent going on and on about me sitting in his lap and reading the newspaper to him when I was a toddler. I don’t actually remember learning how to read. In first grade the teacher would give us stars on a chart for every book we read and at the end of the year we would get a candy bar for every star. Kids took home between 1 to 5 or 6 candy bars. I went home with a case and a half of candy bars. I was tested for Gifted and Talented when I was in 4th grade and placed into the program, it was only funded for 2 years back then. (4th and 5th grade) That’s when my IQ was tested, but I didn’t see the result until I was an adult. My vocabulary is better than 99.7% of the population according to tests, and I didn’t do anything to make that happen except read for pleasure. Speaking of reading, I consume at least one book a day. I use the word consume on purpose. I am always worried I will run out of things to read. It bothers me that when I die, there will be a book I will probably be in the middle of that I will never know the ending of. There is always more to know and a hollow that needs to be filled with that information…an endless hunger for it. It’s like curiosity on steroids. I was different from other children my age from the very beginning, I was interested in things they weren’t. Mythology, astronomy, space…classical music, I got excited about going to the library. I also liked normal kid things but the normal kids didn’t share my many other enthusiasms. I loved the arts, sciences, pretty much anything. I just loved learning. I was made aware very early and often that I was different. That I remembered more, could hold more information in my mind at one time, could recall things quickly, get the answers before others and those answers would be more detailed, nuanced and comprehensive. For a long time I hated this about myself. It was hell in public school in Alabama where I ended up getting my GED in 10th grade so I could go to college early. It was a benefit in that it made many aspects of my life easy. I never worried about school or work because I knew I could fake my way through anything really, using my abilities to quickly absorb and use information. The social consequences of it are always a challenge though. Especially as a woman. For a while I sought to “hide” my intelligence or come across as a normal person, but I could never succeed. I knew this because I would get performance reviews where I would get 360 evaluations from peers, managers, and direct reports and the first word every single person would use to describe me was intelligent. Eventually I realized my vocabulary, and the way in which I solved problems were in themselves a dead giveaway. If I get interested in a topic I have an ability to focus on it to the exclusion of all else and then will just learn everything there is to know about that subject. It can take a day or months to get to the bottom of that topic depending on its complexity but I will stay completely engrossed in that topic until I am satisfied I know enough. Because of this I have deep expertise in lots of random subjects. The worst part of this is that you are conscious of a lot more. You are conscious of more suffering in the world, the connections that create that suffering and the limited ability one person has to reduce it. That doesn’t stop me from doing every little thing I can. The idea that “ignorance is bliss” comes to my mind on a regular basis, and I’ve read enough studies to know that it’s true, people who remain in ignorance of the suffering of others or are indifferent to it, are happier. But as a side effect of that processing power in my noggin, that’s just not possible for me. It can be lonely because you meet very few people who share your interests or concerns. However, simpler people can be soothing to be around. I once tried to explain my way of seeing the world versus the way my less complicated friend did. When he saw an apple, he just thought, mmm, I’m hungry, he took it, and ate it. Very simple.
When I saw the apple, I saw the color, wonder if it’s waxed and if pesticides were used and a list of varieties would flash through my mind, then I would think about the logistics it took to get the apple to where it was, from seed, whether it was genetically modified or heritage, to how it was shipped, to the store, and how much fuel it took etc., then I would think about the symbolism of the apple in human culture, Johnny Appleseed, songs, and muse about how some people believe in the Garden of Eden, if it existed in reality versus metaphor, it was more likely a tomato or pomegranate, before flashing to Apple as symbol for the corporation and a list of the devices and brand associations would zing through my mind…etc. all that would happen in parsecs. THEN I might wonder if I was hungry. Just way too much noise compared to what most people have going on from what I’ve been told. But for a long time, I thought everyone had that going on. It wasn’t until it became overwhelming on occasion and I tried to explain it to someone that I began to realize how not normal it was.
On the spectrum of memory where there are the very few people who can recall every single day of their lives with perfect clarity and replay them to the people who cannot recall much of anything of their life. I am much closer to the people who can recall almost everything. I have many vivid memories from young childhood, 18 months, 2 years old and up that I can replay in my mind. I can remember and replay conversations, sometimes re-read a page of text I’ve seen.
So in these ways I am abnormal. Abnormally smart is still abnormal.

Yes.

People with high IQs, like all humans, use a collection of various senses to detect the presence of another person.

The way humans can sense each other, and sense that they’ve been sensed in return, might sound trivially obvious, but robotics experts will tell you it ain’t.

More that that though, the way humans “become aware” of the physical presence of another person, and then automatically start assembling a “theory of mind” about that second person, using the same sense-inputs, and then use this “theory-if-mind” to decide the other person has also just done the same thing…

…is much more in

Yes.

People with high IQs, like all humans, use a collection of various senses to detect the presence of another person.

The way humans can sense each other, and sense that they’ve been sensed in return, might sound trivially obvious, but robotics experts will tell you it ain’t.

More that that though, the way humans “become aware” of the physical presence of another person, and then automatically start assembling a “theory of mind” about that second person, using the same sense-inputs, and then use this “theory-if-mind” to decide the other person has also just done the same thing…

…is much more interesting thing to talk about than “do high IQ people have some kind of cool way to instantly spot another person with a high IQ, even though almost all the people they meet won’t have even ever taken an IQ test?”

Consider Bill and Steve and WelderBot2000 and a hypothetical terrible company that welds things together.

Steve has entered a work area to weld two pieces of steel together. As soon as he arrives though, he senses - using his eyes - that Bill is still setting up the pieces in the jig or whatever.

At almost the same time, Bill senses that Steve has entered, but then he does something very clever: because he is able to sense that Steve’s welding torch is Snot lit, he combines this with other observations to build a theory-of-mind about Steve.

Even without exchanging information directly, Bill and Steve can reliably guess that they are both paying attention. And because of this, Steve will not attempt to start welding, and Bill not panic and run off and trigger a safety shutdown for no reason.

Then WelderBot2000 comes in and because nobody bothered to give it the ability to sense anything as it enters a room, except pieces of steel, it lights its torch right up and starts rolling inexorably toward the steel pieces, and Bill and Steve run away to stop getting squished and welded, and this triggers a safety shutdown.

Now to be fair to the fine people at WelderBot Welding Bots Inc, WelderBot2000 does have some very very good triple-redundant sensors all over it. But these only trigger if WelderBot2000 starts crushing a human, and there are no sensors to top him torching one. Not being set on fire by Welderbot2000 is entirely reliant on the humans around it paying attention and following the safety rules. And anyway, its sensing of a human isn’t the biggest problem. The biggest problem is that WelderBot2000 only has one response to an activated don’t-kill-the-human sensor, and that’s to halt the assembly line and trigger a safety shutdown.

Steve, on the other hand, could simply say “Hey Bill, let us know when the rig is set, I’ll wait” and that means Steve can dismiss the possibility of Bill suddenly lighting his torch, rushing across the room, and jumping up and down on Steve’s face. The ability to adopt different levels of alertness gives humans incredible flexibility to collaborate.

Bill and Steve have no ideal about each other’s IQ, of course, but they can both reasonably assume they are much smarter than WelderBot2000 (if not necessarily more likely to survive the upcoming company restructure).

Back to the actual question though, and when you think about it’s really quite odd that one of the ways we use “sense” is to mean we have acquired information from the external world, without depending on our everyday senses. Or indeed even using them at all…

…and in fact this usage is so common that if you say “I sensed you eat that last cookie!” then most people will assume you’re saying that the cookie-thief was NOT directly observed stealing the cookie.

And if they say: “Oh yeah, how?” and you say “With my EYES dingbat!”, then most people will assume that you are, much like this answer, being facetious.

I’m going to be straight with you. Laying it all on table.

I don’t avoid people who are intelligent. I avoid people who have no god damn idea, how they are boring as hell and talk about things at the wrong time and at the wrong place.

I’m in a bar. A bar!

With friends and amongst these friends is a woman I don’t know. They brought her along because from what one of them said to me a week ago, is she has no friends, or friends that really don’t want to spend time with her.

Even her relatives, don’t want to and co-workers don’t.

Now that is telling but I’m find with someone new with us.

But here she i

I’m going to be straight with you. Laying it all on table.

I don’t avoid people who are intelligent. I avoid people who have no god damn idea, how they are boring as hell and talk about things at the wrong time and at the wrong place.

I’m in a bar. A bar!

With friends and amongst these friends is a woman I don’t know. They brought her along because from what one of them said to me a week ago, is she has no friends, or friends that really don’t want to spend time with her.

Even her relatives, don’t want to and co-workers don’t.

Now that is telling but I’m find with someone new with us.

But here she is, sitting next time, turns round and talks about fucking engineering, politics, and all the kind of stuff I don’t want to hear, and it’s friday.

My brain is mashed. I just finished a two hour gruelling boring presentation by a guy who talks like no is in the room, data, data, data and his presentation has tons of text and he reads it all, no interactivity, no personality and burning my brain.

Two hours of that!

Then another hour of sitting listening to a manager who can’t stop talking. I even told the manager, he talks too much, needs to cut to chase and just say what he can in a min so we can get the work done!

So here I am at a bar, it’s friday, I just want to relax, have fun and if any talk, I don’t want it to be about work and what she does, is suddenly after talking about politics, she talks about her..job!

I got up, went outside to drink in fresh air and my friend comes over and says..

“I know. She’s a bit much.”
“You think?!” I say.

I don’t avoid intelligent people. I avoid people who have no social skills, people who are dry, people who are drama, people who act like victims and people who just don’t get that in certain environments you need to give a rest.

I don’t care how smart a woman is, how intelligent she is. She can have the highest damn I.Q but if she hasn’t the brain cells to understand the simplest thing about caring about other people, investing time and knowledge in being social, and there is a time and place for everything, I am so not going to even bother.

Intelligence isn’t what you know it’s about how you an adapt, relate to others and looking at it, the “intelligent” want the world to relate to them.

Lighten up.

First get to know the person, have a bit of fun, appreciate the settings, environment you are in and appreciate, some of us, have been intelligent for long gruelling hours and bursting to just let our hair down for a bit.

So lighten up a bit.

Most of the answers here are from people who are quite smarter than average. “Things you say go over the little-brains’ heads,” etc. But with all due respect to the smartest guy in the room, I don’t think that really answers the question from the perspective of the truly problematic tier of intelligence, so I will try to do so. I’m speaking for myself, but I’m also speaking for the handful of others like me that I’ve met.

First, you probably don’t know any of us. We’re not the doctors at the hospital or the CEOs of big corporations. Those are smart guys but they’re way too well-adjusted to be o

Most of the answers here are from people who are quite smarter than average. “Things you say go over the little-brains’ heads,” etc. But with all due respect to the smartest guy in the room, I don’t think that really answers the question from the perspective of the truly problematic tier of intelligence, so I will try to do so. I’m speaking for myself, but I’m also speaking for the handful of others like me that I’ve met.

First, you probably don’t know any of us. We’re not the doctors at the hospital or the CEOs of big corporations. Those are smart guys but they’re way too well-adjusted to be one of us. We MIGHT be the reclusive professor scratching away on a blackboard at midnight looking for the big answer to the impossible question, but if so I can assure you, he’s not there to help you, he’s there for his own reason.

We’re not writing books for your entertainment or edification; in fact, we’re not communicating with you on any level at all. We do consider the masses “beneath us,” just as you suspect we do. There’s almost nothing you can say or do that we find interesting or entertaining. Some of you are funny. I do enjoy that.

Most of us would be classified by you as mentally ill, and many of us actually become quite so. We’re prone to alcoholism and suicide.

We have a tendency toward moral corruption and ethical ambivalence. Our ability to follow a much longer chain of reasoning than you allows us to see clearly that humanity has recently passed the tipping point for techno-slavery. We are already servants of our technological masters, and the gap is only going to widen from here forward. Within that context - living among the damned - morality becomes a gray area. The Unabomber is one of us.

Holding a job is a challenge. Having any kind of goal is essentially out of the question. Friends become tiresome. Relationships with the opposite sex tend to be catastrophic. We may be interested in the nature of reality but not the reality of reality.

We’re just not your people. We don’t understand you. Grasping concepts seems, to me, a simple effort of will, so the extension of that line of thinking is that YOU, failing to understand, are merely intellectually lazy. My aunt, the other person in my family with the curse of high IQ (which we inherited from my paternal grandfather, an engineering supervisor who never attended college), advised me to think of my superior intellect as no different from having one particularly strong muscle. Which is good advice but hard to follow when confronted with the daily chore of condescending to the lowest common denominator of society. My ego is unmanageable and I’m oblivious to it.

Some of us adjust. You’ve reaped the benefits of that but you don’t care much. There are some of us right this moment at Cambridge, or elsewhere, delving deeply into Quantum Field Theory and trying to figure out whether or not you’re actually just a very sophisticated hologram (tip: you are). But you don’t want to know that, you want to know whether Meghan Markle is going to have a boy or a girl.

Ultimately while I do see myself as superior, I’m simultaneously jealous of the easily-amused masses. It would be wonderful to simply put in my 80 years on Planet Earth and die with a stupid grin on my face. But it ain’t going to go down like that.

Intelligent people always know that they are not intelligent, its just something other people think about them. So you can always observe some specific traits and tell if someone is smart or not.

Some people say Intelligent people are born that way. But I disagree. May be they are special but they do work hard and they do have some specific traits.

Intelligence comes from Knowledge and Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working and experience). Intelligent people knowingly or unknowingly follow this logic. Here are some of the traits that smart people carry on. They would follow most or a

Intelligent people always know that they are not intelligent, its just something other people think about them. So you can always observe some specific traits and tell if someone is smart or not.

Some people say Intelligent people are born that way. But I disagree. May be they are special but they do work hard and they do have some specific traits.

Intelligence comes from Knowledge and Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working and experience). Intelligent people knowingly or unknowingly follow this logic. Here are some of the traits that smart people carry on. They would follow most or all of the these traits.

  • Intelligent people ask many questions.
  • Intelligent people read a lot.
  • Intelligent people learn a lot.
  • Intelligent people grasp a lot
  • Intelligent people dig deep, they go in detail.
  • Intelligent people focus on raising their awareness, 360 degree awareness.
  • Intelligent people are interested in variety of things, not just one subject.
  • Intelligent people work hard.
  • Intelligent people experiment. They fail and fail again to achieve success.
  • Intelligent people explore.
  • Intelligent people stay focused.
  • Intelligent people have fun.
  • Intelligent people are mix of artistry and technicality - some are more artistic than technical and vice versa, but they do use both sides of their brain - logical side and artistic side.

If someone does have most of the above traits, you can consider them to be smart enough.

Intelligence has nothing to do with the ability to answer questions or how successful you have been. Just because you know somethings (technical or otherwise) does not qualify you as intelligent.

Your level of "Awareness" defines your level of Intelligence.
Measure the level of Awareness, and you can tell how intelligent someone is.

Assuming - by smart, you mean Intelligence, and not "cleverness".

More aware you are, of yourself, of your surroundings - better off you are than the rest. It changes your perspective, it opens door for your growth and it makes you amazingly smart.

Awareness comes from Knowledge. Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working, experience).

Evolution theory supports this narrative. Humans became more aware thru acquired knowledge thru practice, than the rest of living chain and thus became more intelligent. You can apply the same awareness principal to individuals.

You are only intelligent if you are aware. All living forms have some level of awareness and hence some level of intelligence. There are, of course, different levels of Awareness one can achieve and hence we have different levels of intelligence among all living beings and among all human beings.

Buddha, Mohammad, Christ reached a new level of awareness that gave birth to new religions.

Darwin reached a new level of awareness that gave birth to Theory of Evolution and our better yet understanding of life on earth.

Albert Einstein reached a new level of awareness that gave birth to Theory of Relativity and our better yet understanding of the Universe.
The highest form of intelligence is Awareness.

How much aware are you - about yourself, about surroundings, about everything, about existence? Whoever reaches a new peak of awareness - is worshiped for generations.

Measure their level of Awareness, and you can tell how smart someone is.

I agree with Robert Allen — the eyes are a big giveaway. Not that all smart people make eye contact — some are shy, or maybe they’re Aspies like me. But intelligent people have inquisitive, understanding eyes, while at the opposite extreme unintelligent ones have a sort of glassy bovine stare.

Beyond that —

Intelligent people tend to have a large working vocabulary and a good command of grammar, and to be articulate. They may speak with great rapidly when excited about a topic.

Intelligent people tend to have a good sense of humor, indeed, the word “wit,” which is now used to characterize sense o

I agree with Robert Allen — the eyes are a big giveaway. Not that all smart people make eye contact — some are shy, or maybe they’re Aspies like me. But intelligent people have inquisitive, understanding eyes, while at the opposite extreme unintelligent ones have a sort of glassy bovine stare.

Beyond that —

Intelligent people tend to have a large working vocabulary and a good command of grammar, and to be articulate. They may speak with great rapidly when excited about a topic.

Intelligent people tend to have a good sense of humor, indeed, the word “wit,” which is now used to characterize sense of humor, was originally used to connote intelligence as well (a trace of the old usage remains in the expression “he has his wits about him”).

Intelligent people tend to be interested and curious. They pick up on new concepts quickly and they are comfortable with concepts, as opposed to information.

Intelligent people tend to offer intellectually sophisticated explanations of phenomena. They understand better how the world works.

Intelligent people tend to be more interested in sophisticated thought of every variety, including in music and art. In the latter, their tastes tend to be fairly catholic, as they easily master various forms.

Intelligent people tend to know a lot. This of course is a matter of curiosity and education as well as intelligence, but intelligent people seem to absorb information more rapidly than less intelligent people.

Intelligent people zoom in on essential philosophical or conceptual underpinnings.

Intelligent people are good problem and puzzle solvers and can think on their feet. They can often answer questions that others can’t, despite knowing less about a topic.

Rumor to the contrary notwithstanding, intelligent people often have big heads.

All subject to variation, of course, but these are some of the criteria that I use.

A2A: Thank you so much for this question! :)

Virtually all of us have or will come in contact with somebody more intelligent than us, and our decision how to react to this exposure will either stifle our progress in life (if we allow ourselves to get intimidated) or will give us wings to reach our dreams (if we recognize it as an opportunity to learn).

It is really important to differentiate between deliberate intimidation by intelligence and unaware intimidation, by somebody clearly more intelligent. Then, there is the less intelligent receiving side, and the question of their perception of the

A2A: Thank you so much for this question! :)

Virtually all of us have or will come in contact with somebody more intelligent than us, and our decision how to react to this exposure will either stifle our progress in life (if we allow ourselves to get intimidated) or will give us wings to reach our dreams (if we recognize it as an opportunity to learn).

It is really important to differentiate between deliberate intimidation by intelligence and unaware intimidation, by somebody clearly more intelligent. Then, there is the less intelligent receiving side, and the question of their perception of the more intelligent person’s behavior.

When both parties are of about equal intelligence, unaware intimidation is not really possible, and all that is left is just deliberate showing off. That is, if here is a dynamic of intimidation between them, because there does not have to be at all.

So, let’s take a scenario between two people A and B, where A is clearly more intelligent than B, and look at the possibilities from the point of view of each, B and A.

A is either:

Deliberately intimidating B. This would mean that either: a) A has high IQ and low EQ, meaning has little compassion, does not read people well, and does not care how intimidation makes them feel, and derives pleasure from dominance and self-aggrandizing. b) A is really upset with B, and does not find any other weapon except to humiliate them by picking at their weak points, weak in relation to A.

OR

Is unaware of the intimidation effect A has on B. That generally means that the receiving party in the conversation B perceives it as intimidation, whereas it is not in the mind of A at all.

Which takes us to the point of view of B, when the inequality of intelligence is obvious. B’s reaction to the more intelligent A is really independent from whether A means or does not mean to intimidate B. The feeling of being intimidated is depends solely on the B’s mindset.

B is either:

Intimidated by the A’s intelligence. This reaction is really based on fear of being embarrassed in front of others, of failing, of hurting one’s ego. However, all those fears are an illusion, and it is much healthier to stand up for yourself and for what you know and do not yet know and own it. It just means so much more self-respect to have the guts and say what you do not know but want to learn. People respect that. Especially, intelligent people, because that is how they arrived at their intelligence— through admitting what they lack and reaching out to fill those gaps. Intelligence is hard work, and honesty, and courage. Putting up defense walls, shutting down, closing in is a self-destructive reaction, and someone else’s intelligence should only be seen as luck to be exposed to and an opportunity to learn from someone else something that B does not know. The exposure to intelligence is free learning, and the most exciting and natural way to learn in the world! I personally always seek out people smarter than me, this is what makes life beautiful and living fascinating! :)

OR

Not intimidated by A’s intelligence. B has the courage to admit what they do not know or understand, so that they can clearly identify it and then develop a strategy of how to attain the intelligence they lack. This is how B will learn, will grow, develop, and can become more intelligent, even more than all those who were once more intelligent than B-- put together.

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Knowledge is one of the few things in life that increase when shared. If you have an apple, and you share it with your friend, then each of you will have only a half. Share it will 3 friends, and you each will have a quarter. But with knowledge it is so amazing! You share it with a others, and you do not lose anything, but instead— there is so much more of it. What is really fascinating is that, when knowledge is shared, the whole of it is not a mere sum of its parts. Instead, it creates a complex adaptive system of minds, where each person receives information, builds a reaction to it, shares it back, then back again, and the many of them together can put the pieces of a puzzle together, a puzzle that now can come alive as a completely new concept. Whereas each of them, with an equal amount of knowledge, but in isolation, would not come up with this concept.

It is funny, but very few people with a relatively high level of intelligence will ever try to intimidate us with their intelligence. Intimidation will not even be part of their mental vocabulary of behavior: they will be focused on the subject and maybe even oblivious to other people’s being intimidated. They do not mean to intimidate or size up the “opponent”, and the whole concept of intimidation is foreign and irrelevant to them. They only care and focus on the issue. Often, the situation is the opposite: people who feel disadvantaged intellectually will try to intimidate others, to compensate for their self-perceived shortcomings.

We will always find somebody more intelligent than us, but we will also always find somebody less intelligent. So to say that we are in either one of the camps would not be accurate. We are all somewhere on a continuum, we all have neighbors on either side, and our positions on this continuum change, depending on our health, devotion to learning, drive, and also what aspect of our intelligence we are considering.

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I really cannot think of anyone deliberately intimidating others with their intelligence, without any extraordinary reason. Somebody like that would be a walking oxymoron. I honestly do not have any specific examples, because I have never witnessed it in my life, ever. However, for a list of pseudo-intimidation by intelligence, please see my answer here: Vera Dragilyova's answer to How do I know if I'm more intelligent than others?

This answer contains a few examples of how people try to appear more intelligent than someone else by brute force or cunning antics, and through intimidation that is not scary but rather vulgar and even funny.

Imagine that there are three levels of intelligence: average, above average, and smart. Everyone can tell the difference between people of average intelligence and smart people, but it’s a little tougher to distinguish people of above average intelligence from either category. Also imagine that there are social benefits that accrue as you move to the right on that list.

People who are above average are worried about being mistaken for average, so they put forth an effort to show that they’re above average. They’ll do things that would be difficult for those of average intelligence to do, so tha

Imagine that there are three levels of intelligence: average, above average, and smart. Everyone can tell the difference between people of average intelligence and smart people, but it’s a little tougher to distinguish people of above average intelligence from either category. Also imagine that there are social benefits that accrue as you move to the right on that list.

People who are above average are worried about being mistaken for average, so they put forth an effort to show that they’re above average. They’ll do things that would be difficult for those of average intelligence to do, so that everyone knows that they can, and is led to believe that they’re of above average intelligence.

People who are smart aren’t worried about being perceived as average, but they are worried about being perceived as merely above average, and that is a potential outcome if they make the same efforts that the above average people do. So they don’t make those efforts, instead relying on everyone else to be able to distinguish them from those of average intelligence.

The behavior that the people of above average intelligence are engaging in here is known as signaling, and the behavior the smart people are engaging in is known as countersignaling. The classic paper on the topic is Too Cool for School? Signalling and Countersignalling, and it’s good for both theoretical and experimental support for these behaviors.

Despite what most people in this thread say I believe that, on average, intelligent people do look intelligent. I don't mean physiognomy, I doubt that you'd be able to pick out a smart corpse out of a line up of ten naked bodies in a morgue. But I believe there are other non-verbal tells, like behavior, fashion choices, and general context of where you see these people, that can help you to make vaguely correct assumptions.

I find smarter people to be watchful and focused, but not neurotic. Whatever environment they are in they are likely to observe it rather than participate in it.

Reasonable s

Despite what most people in this thread say I believe that, on average, intelligent people do look intelligent. I don't mean physiognomy, I doubt that you'd be able to pick out a smart corpse out of a line up of ten naked bodies in a morgue. But I believe there are other non-verbal tells, like behavior, fashion choices, and general context of where you see these people, that can help you to make vaguely correct assumptions.

I find smarter people to be watchful and focused, but not neurotic. Whatever environment they are in they are likely to observe it rather than participate in it.

Reasonable style choices are always a good tell. People who are flashy, mainstream, and overly branded are unlikely to have mature minds. Dressing with subtlety, precision, and personality takes some brainpower. And then there are people who simply don't care about the way they dress, those are hard to read.

Mannerisms, culture, context - all those things add up to give you a pretty good idea of whether the person is above average or not.

There is some margin of error, sure, but I believe that about 8–9 times out of ten you’d be able to profile people correctly by observing them for a couple of minutes.

As a normal person this is my opinion and some of my readings but actually i'm not a psychology student or something so if anything was wrong about my answer i'm sorry .

Highly creative people tend to think for themselves, they are not easily influenced or swayed by others, and they can easily think outside the “box”.

Of course to be creative intelligence is important but it's one of too many charactristics for being highly creative .

Creativity is the advanced level of intelligence .

General Characteristics of Creative Individuals:

  1. Genuinely values intellectual and cognitive matters.
  2. Values own ind

As a normal person this is my opinion and some of my readings but actually i'm not a psychology student or something so if anything was wrong about my answer i'm sorry .

Highly creative people tend to think for themselves, they are not easily influenced or swayed by others, and they can easily think outside the “box”.

Of course to be creative intelligence is important but it's one of too many charactristics for being highly creative .

Creativity is the advanced level of intelligence .

General Characteristics of Creative Individuals:

  1. Genuinely values intellectual and cognitive matters.
  2. Values own independence and autonomy.
  3. Is verbally fluent; can express ideas well.
  4. Enjoys aesthetic impressions; is aesthetically reactive.
  5. Is productive; gets things done.
  6. Is concerned with philosophical problems, for example, religion, values, the meaning of life.
  7. Has high aspiration level for self.
  8. Has wide range of interests.
  9. Thinks and associates ideas in unusual ways; has unconventional thought processes; can make unusual connections to unrelated ideas or things.
  10. Is an interesting, arresting person.
  11. Appears straightforward, forthright and candid in dealings with others.
  12. Behaves in an ethically consistent manner; has consistent personal standards