Why are intelligent people more forgetful than average intelligent people?

Memory depends fundamentally on Attention. If the attention paid to something is weak or faulty, so will be the memory of that thing. If the attention is absent, so will be the memory.

There are many things someone with a very high IQ might neglect to observe in his/her surroundings due to larger interest in abstract matters, as well as, in some cases, the greater ability to produce vivid mental images. Both things would lead one to pay attention more to one’s own inner processes (thoughts, feelings, etc.) than to the external world.

Such an absent-mindedness regarding mundane tasks and a focus

Memory depends fundamentally on Attention. If the attention paid to something is weak or faulty, so will be the memory of that thing. If the attention is absent, so will be the memory.

There are many things someone with a very high IQ might neglect to observe in his/her surroundings due to larger interest in abstract matters, as well as, in some cases, the greater ability to produce vivid mental images. Both things would lead one to pay attention more to one’s own inner processes (thoughts, feelings, etc.) than to the external world.

Such an absent-mindedness regarding mundane tasks and a focus on one’s own mind results in a great deal of forgetfulness regarding a host of normal everyday things.

There are a couple of reasons why this may be true. First the type of job they have may be taxing on their brain or memory causing forgetfulness. Or they may be less likely to create fictitious memories. I call it creating revisionist history. Some people don’t remember exactly what happened, so they fill in the blanks. Lawyers know this, so they ask you the same question different ways to make you appear to be a liar. Dumb people fall for this a lot. Smarter people see that it’s a ruse and just say they don’t remember. You also tend to forget if you have a lot on your mind—a la the nutty prof

There are a couple of reasons why this may be true. First the type of job they have may be taxing on their brain or memory causing forgetfulness. Or they may be less likely to create fictitious memories. I call it creating revisionist history. Some people don’t remember exactly what happened, so they fill in the blanks. Lawyers know this, so they ask you the same question different ways to make you appear to be a liar. Dumb people fall for this a lot. Smarter people see that it’s a ruse and just say they don’t remember. You also tend to forget if you have a lot on your mind—a la the nutty professor. It’s not a priority to remember small things as long as you remember the big issues.

The “Absent Minded Professor” is partially a myth. Highly intelligent folk seem to miss or even reject ordinary worldly events when they are concentrating on what is important. When one is working on the evidence for such things as exoplanets and possible alien life, one will refuse to be bogged down with time-wasting details of the domestic “to-do” list. Geniuses may forget where their car is in the car-park and lose their keys, too. However, they always know how to use the keys once found and how to drive the vehicle out of the lot once located. Besides, why commit to memory what can be writ

The “Absent Minded Professor” is partially a myth. Highly intelligent folk seem to miss or even reject ordinary worldly events when they are concentrating on what is important. When one is working on the evidence for such things as exoplanets and possible alien life, one will refuse to be bogged down with time-wasting details of the domestic “to-do” list. Geniuses may forget where their car is in the car-park and lose their keys, too. However, they always know how to use the keys once found and how to drive the vehicle out of the lot once located. Besides, why commit to memory what can be written down?

No, they are not. In general, more intelligent people can memorize better than less intelligent people.

You may sometimes get the impression that they forget quickly. It is not because intelligent people cannot memorize well, but because they don’t pay attention to the matter that they find insignificant. Intelligent people are very good at categorizing the significance of the matters they see. It happens on a subconscious level.

Of course, there are exceptions. Furthermore, IQ and memorization capacity are not correlated on a 1:1 scale.

They’re not! That’s a myth that was perpetuated by the humor making fun of the absent minded professor, you sometimes see in comedy movies. If actual professors were that absent minded, they wouldn’t be able to maintain tenure by writing text books and teaching.

I’ve known lots of highly intelligent people during my life, if anything, they have very active minds and don’t forget important things, but like those who are average, they let unimportant things pass.

Are they?

I've forgotten…

Well… maybe they have more things to forget. Maybe they try harder to bring more ideas and words to the table.

Maybe they are distracted- thinking of other things, or thinking about three sentences ahead.

Or maybe intelligent people are actually stupid and stupid people are actually smart… there are folks who are currently trying to sell you just that… I wouldn't let them near my pocketbook.

Just a life lesson, you know.

It's called sometime the absent minded professor, I can only explain it in analogy not perfectly… like if you have one or three things on your mind you are focused more and remember easily but if you are working big problems in your head and they are lofty and you have 100 or 1000 tracks you may be very absent or forgetful.

That's not true!

They just

You know

are weird…..

No but everyone is forgetful and intelligent people aren't forgetfull but rather it's not at the top of their priorities.

Is there another rather i don't know at this point English is dumb!

I live in Roswell, Georgia, which is about 20 minutes north of Atlanta. I walked in and immediately was able to vote in the general election, and was behind one person when I voted in the Senate runoff in January. Roswell is 74% white and 11% black with a population of about 90,000.

Union City, Georgia is in Fulton County along with Roswell (and most of Atlanta). Union City is 81% black, 8.6% white and has a population of just over 20,000. Here is a photo of the polling location for Union City in the general election last year.

To answer your question, perhaps those in the photo above didn’t exp

I live in Roswell, Georgia, which is about 20 minutes north of Atlanta. I walked in and immediately was able to vote in the general election, and was behind one person when I voted in the Senate runoff in January. Roswell is 74% white and 11% black with a population of about 90,000.

Union City, Georgia is in Fulton County along with Roswell (and most of Atlanta). Union City is 81% black, 8.6% white and has a population of just over 20,000. Here is a photo of the polling location for Union City in the general election last year.

To answer your question, perhaps those in the photo above didn’t expect to have to wait because they thought (foolishly I know) that their polling location would be similar to my own.

After all, they’re in the same county. But in the same county of a state wherein the average wait in the last hour of polling in majority-minority zones is 51 minutes, while that wait in majority-white zones is 6 minutes. But Republican lawmakers in Georgia are just “shocked” at people saying their election reforms smell just a bit like Jim Crowe.

My ass. They know exactly what they’re doing.

Line to vote in the primaries, June 2020. Source.

Republican “election advisors” have been managing to get polling locations closed to “save money” in black neighborhoods for years. Those locations that managed to stay open complained to the Republican Secretary of State’s Office that they had defective or non working voting machines that needed to be replaced and received … nothing, further exacerbating wait times in polling locations that just happen to be predominately Democrat.

So why on Earth is a single person surprised when, after the state elects two Democratic Senators and a Democratic President despite all of the crap I just described, the Republican controlled State Legislature passes voting reforms that will cost the state $50 million dollars and give the Republican controlled state legislature the power to unilaterally determine a county’s election board isn’t performing adequately and take over control themselves (including the four most populous counties of Fulton, Cobb, Gwinnett and DeKalb - collectively 3.5 million of the 10.5 million total in the state).

It also allows anyone in the state to contest election results if they feel like they saw fraud occurring at a polling location (keep in mind a rural outpost of this state elected Marjorie Green To Congress), and overall made it just a little more difficult and/or uncomfortable for people to vote in a manner that disproportionately affects black voters.

So it isn’t an issue of whether one is smart enough to vote. And it isn’t an issue of providing water. And it isn’t even an issue of ID, because on the list of complaints regarding voting in Georgia ID restrictions are WAY down the list. But when it’s just one thing after another to make it a little more difficult for blacks to vote over time it adds up. And collectively it’s leads to quite reasonable accusations of racism against the state assembly, corporations distancing themselves from state Republican lawmakers, and questions like this, which (to me) is implying minority voters should have to bring water with them to vote.

When I had to wait about 30 seconds.

I upvoted Dan Bentley-Baker’s answer, because (as he said) he was only comparing IQs of 100 and 140. However, there is a freaky ability that kicks in at super-high IQs, especially in people whose strongest suit is abstract reasoning or spatial reasoning (as opposed to verbal reasoning or numerical reasoning, which are the other categories in an IQ test).

You can’t have a super-high IQ without scoring high in all four categories, so that “freaky ability” is probably shared by all whose IQ is 170 or more. My own IQ is 162 on tests calibrated on 16 standard deviations (e.g., Stanford-Binet), or 15

I upvoted Dan Bentley-Baker’s answer, because (as he said) he was only comparing IQs of 100 and 140. However, there is a freaky ability that kicks in at super-high IQs, especially in people whose strongest suit is abstract reasoning or spatial reasoning (as opposed to verbal reasoning or numerical reasoning, which are the other categories in an IQ test).

You can’t have a super-high IQ without scoring high in all four categories, so that “freaky ability” is probably shared by all whose IQ is 170 or more. My own IQ is 162 on tests calibrated on 16 standard deviations (e.g., Stanford-Binet), or 158 on the sort that uses 15 standard deviations (e.g., Wechsler). That means fewer than 1 out of 18,000 score as high as, or higher than, I do. (A “Stanford-Binet” IQ score of 145 equates to a “Wechsler” IQ score of 142, and about 1 out of 400 score that high or higher. So a “normal” genius is far too “dumb” to have this freaky ability.)

I’m far “dumber” than people whose IQ is 170 or more. (I know that, because I’ve worked with such people.) Yet I have about as much of this freaky ability as anyone, because my abstract and spatial reasoning are far better than my verbal and numerical reasoning.

I’ll give you a mundane example of this freaky ability.

I’m 76 years old. As a young man, I served in the US Army. All us soldiers were taught how to tie a tie “the Army way” (with a four-in-hand knot). About 25 years ago, that was still the only tie knot I knew. But then Nelson Mandela became South Africa’s president, and I saw that his tie knot looked like an equilateral triangle (except, of course, at its upper corners, which his collar hid, and at its bottom corner, where the tie emerged from a tiny opening.) Years later, I would learn that it is called a Windsor knot, but at the time, I only knew that I loved it.

So when I went to bed that night, I instructed my brain to figure out how to make that tie knot, and to awaken me when it finished. Hours later, I awoke from a dream that consisted solely of a tie slowly wrapping itself into that knot. I arose, grabbed a tie and replicated that motion, with it around my neck. I repeated that a couple more times, to make sure I wouldn’t forget how to do it. Then I got dressed, so that I would have a collar to hide the knot’s upper corners under. I retied the tie and looked at the result in a mirror. It was perfect (as I knew it would be).

That ability to solve complex problems subconsciously (while asleep or in a stupor) is truly freaky. History’s best-known examples of it are the bathtub dream of Archimedes, and Einstein’s “ride alongside a light beam” (which he surely had to be in a stupor to imagine). But folks with super-high IQs can give plenty personal examples that are no less freaky, even when the results are as mundane as Mandela’s tie knot.

  • They listen and observe a lot more than they speak and act. A lot of their energy is used up thinking and so they often do not have enough to spare for continuous work. And so, they often sit passively and quietly until they feel that action is necessary.
  • They have a passive and somewhat effortless authority about them. They will not give orders or be rude, nor offensive to establish dominance within a social group. But when you speak to someone who is intelligent, you will have no choice but to tailor your conversations and behaviours around them, otherwise you will feel very out of your eleme
  • They listen and observe a lot more than they speak and act. A lot of their energy is used up thinking and so they often do not have enough to spare for continuous work. And so, they often sit passively and quietly until they feel that action is necessary.
  • They have a passive and somewhat effortless authority about them. They will not give orders or be rude, nor offensive to establish dominance within a social group. But when you speak to someone who is intelligent, you will have no choice but to tailor your conversations and behaviours around them, otherwise you will feel very out of your element.
  • They work efficiently and not endlessly. Intelligent people are more able to construct workable systems and routines that efficiently and innovatively give them the same results as someone whom would be working all day and every day.
  • The constant need for intellectual stimulation means that most of their hobbies will either be creative, or things that allow to continuously learn new skills. Reading is a clear indicator.
  • They are extremely patient. Their intelligence allows them to not fall under pressure as easily, withstand long periods of low activity, and can last longer in otherwise very mentally exhausting situations than someone whom is perhaps not as intelligent.
  • Very resourceful. They are able to produce shockingly adequate results with less time, money, and overall energy exertion. A lot of intelligent people actually become lazy for this reason.
  • Can pick up talents very easily. Their ability to observe, analyse, break down into steps, and apply means that they can learn very quickly any skill required. Intelligent people can ironically feel impatient in this regard. For if they cannot learn a skill straight away, they often fear that they will not know how to deal with the environment adequately and so will not go there.
  • Extremely socially influential. In groups, the intelligent person is usually the very quiet one whom seldom gives their own opinion, or contributes to conversations. However, when asked for input, they usually say something that cuts to the heart of the matter and changes everyone's perspective.
  • Very morally disciplined people. I say perhaps stubborn. But intelligent need a moralistic and philosophical structure to which to function in. Intelligent people do not see the world in terms of what work there is to do or what money there is to be made, because the intelligent person often fears that he will crack under the pressure of his own conscious activity. To compensate, you will find intelligent people always contemplating new philosophical or abstract moral concepts to build and live by. They live inside their heads and so I guess they need their interior structure up to scratch.
  • Intelligent people are often mistaken for being insane and mentally challenged. Some even go as far as to use high intelligence as a diagnostic symptom of a personality disorders or learning disability.
  • Often tired all of the time despite doing what looks like no work.
  • Their work ethic is different. Intelligent people work less, they don't have the energy otherwise. So they are often quite good delegators, with efficient planning skills.
  • Very calm in crisis.
  • Skilled debators. The secret to intelligent debating is being able to articulate your own perspective accurately rather than to argue aggressively.
  • Able to talk themselves in and out of any situation.
  • Are not threatened by social groups. Their skill in conversation and analysing social environments means they are able to talk to many different kinds of people and gain their respect.