Which jobs will become non-existant in the coming years?

In the future, what is the guarantee of the existence of Mankind?

In the same manner, which manual jobs would turn into automated is still a talk of the town. Every day/week, there is a new technology which gives rise to layoff of few employees in the world.

Indeed, as it is predicted before, by 2030 over 2 billion jobs will disappear. Again, this is not a doom and gloom prediction, rather a wakeup call for the world.

It can range from high paying to low level jobs.

I am trying to highlight few of them:

  1. Transportation - Going DRIVERLESS

Drivers

Taxi/ Limo/ Bus/ Truck/Mail carrier/Rental car personnel

In the future, what is the guarantee of the existence of Mankind?

In the same manner, which manual jobs would turn into automated is still a talk of the town. Every day/week, there is a new technology which gives rise to layoff of few employees in the world.

Indeed, as it is predicted before, by 2030 over 2 billion jobs will disappear. Again, this is not a doom and gloom prediction, rather a wakeup call for the world.

It can range from high paying to low level jobs.

I am trying to highlight few of them:

  1. Transportation - Going DRIVERLESS

Drivers

Taxi/ Limo/ Bus/ Truck/Mail carrier/Rental car personnel driver

Public Safety

Traffic cops/ Meter maids/ Traffic court judges/ Traffic court lawyers/ Traffic court DAs/ Traffic court support staff

Misc.

Parking lot attendants/ Valet attendants/Car wash workers

2. Education

Teaching requires experts. Learning only requires coaches.

With all of the assets in place, we are moving quickly into the new frontier of a teacherless education system.

Jobs Going Away

Teachers/ Trainers/ Professors

3. Bots

Jobs Going away

Fishing bots will replace fishermen.

Mining bots will replace miners.

Ag bots will replace farmers.

Inspection bots will replace human inspectors.

Warrior drones will replace soldiers.

Robots can pick up building material coming out of the 3D printer and begin building a house with it.

4. Mass Energy Storage

Jobs Going away

Energy planners

Environmental designers

Energy auditors

Power plant operators

Miners

Oil well drillers, roughnecks

Geologists

Meter readers

Gas/propane delivery

5. Robots

Jobs endanger
Medical/ Maintenance/ Retail

No need to be stressed, there will be new jobs created due to the above new jobs.

We can have this for another answer.

Footnote:
Images: Google
http://www.futuristspeaker.com/business-trends/2-billion-jobs-to-disappear-by-2030/
162 Future Jobs: Preparing for Jobs that Don’t Yet Exist

A lot. It's estimated that by 2030, two billion jobs we have now will be gone.

I'm not going to describe all two billion for you. Instead, I'll focus some main categories.


Driverless automobiles will cancel the need for drivers. Don't just thing about passenger cars; think about truck drivers, mail delivery, bus drivers, waste collectors and taxi drivers. The same will happen to boats, planes and trains.

3D printing will, apart from eradicating jobs in clothing and shoe manufacturing, allow local production, so the shipping industry will suffer a lot, even more when fossil fuel runs out (since

A lot. It's estimated that by 2030, two billion jobs we have now will be gone.

I'm not going to describe all two billion for you. Instead, I'll focus some main categories.


Driverless automobiles will cancel the need for drivers. Don't just thing about passenger cars; think about truck drivers, mail delivery, bus drivers, waste collectors and taxi drivers. The same will happen to boats, planes and trains.

3D printing will, apart from eradicating jobs in clothing and shoe manufacturing, allow local production, so the shipping industry will suffer a lot, even more when fossil fuel runs out (since solar and wind energy are often produced locally too).

In shipping, a lot of sorting jobs will also be lost, since everything will be automated; quicker, safer and cheaper. This applies to loading containers on and off ships, mail sorting and warehouse ordering. In Amazon's warehouse, most ordering already goes with robots.

Really, the impact of bots will be quite big. Bots will replace heaps of jobs, such as fisherman, miners, farmers, inspectors, soldiers and construction builders.

And if you look at SIRI or how Google Glass allows a no-touch interface, you'll realise that helpdesk services will mostly be automated. School will also be automated, so no more need for teachers, professors and trainers.


These above categories account for five hundred million jobs, from those two billion. The other one and a half billion jobs come from other categories, and indirectly.

To give a slight hint: driverless cars will also result in less accidents, so less police, firemen and doctors will be needed. With less doctors, there'll be less hospitals. Less hospitals means less electricians. Less electricians mean less wholesalers for electricions.

It's one step that follows another.

Interesting question! Repairman seem to be going extinct as we used to have 5 stores and no we have none. The biggest one I see is energy. I don’t know how far into the future but gas stations and energy companies will require less to no workers in the future. There are energy solutions that fit into a small space and will run your house and vehicle. The standard auto-mechanic will ne non-existent in the future as transportation changes. Air lines and air line pilots will not be necessary as we come up with new modes of transportation. We have the knowledge and the means to change right now bu

Interesting question! Repairman seem to be going extinct as we used to have 5 stores and no we have none. The biggest one I see is energy. I don’t know how far into the future but gas stations and energy companies will require less to no workers in the future. There are energy solutions that fit into a small space and will run your house and vehicle. The standard auto-mechanic will ne non-existent in the future as transportation changes. Air lines and air line pilots will not be necessary as we come up with new modes of transportation. We have the knowledge and the means to change right now but many companies would be hurt if we allowed this to happen quickly. New jobs will come into play as many of those jobs will be replaced with new frontiers. Our world is changing and a cable company would have been an ideal company to start back in the 50’s but in todays fast paced technology not so much. We are going wireless and soon energy will also be wireless. As we advance the parts industry will also take a huge transformation. I am close to the companies that produce all sorts of parts and in the future we will be able to print most all of them. The powder metal industry was a revolutionary industry (and still is) but this is probably what lead us to the printing of parts as they us either powder or melt plastic and powder. If the fuser (heat section) of these part printers get better they will be able to make more parts. Doctors may need a new profession in the future. We are on the edge of technology that will allow people to be scanned by sophisticated sensors that will determine the disease and cure them. This will be done with more electronics and much less actual medicine. I’ve been experimenting with some of these electronic devices and I am dumbfounded at how much they can cure the human body. I have used myself as the test subject so I can confirm that they do work. The Jews in Israel have machines that can operate on a person without ever touching them. They send a signal (ultrasonic wave) into the body that operates on them. As these things all change the associated industries will also change like the insurance industries and all software billing etc.

I expect the 2020’s to be the decade of driverless vehicles. By 2030 most people probably won’t own their own cars. When you need to go somewhere you’ll call a service like Uber and a driverless vehicle will show up at your location to take you wherever you need to go.

The cost of insurance to manually drive a vehicle will increase prohibitively.

Package delivery services will go driverless but probably still have a delivery person in each vehicle to take packages from curb to office, porch, etc.

Long haul trucks will probably be driverless but may have a security person/guard. (Note: There are a

I expect the 2020’s to be the decade of driverless vehicles. By 2030 most people probably won’t own their own cars. When you need to go somewhere you’ll call a service like Uber and a driverless vehicle will show up at your location to take you wherever you need to go.

The cost of insurance to manually drive a vehicle will increase prohibitively.

Package delivery services will go driverless but probably still have a delivery person in each vehicle to take packages from curb to office, porch, etc.

Long haul trucks will probably be driverless but may have a security person/guard. (Note: There are approximately 3.5 million professional truck drivers in the United States.)

Grocery stores are currently working on eliminating cashiers. The act of putting something in your shopping basket will add it to your tab and when you exit the store your account will be charged.

Between Walmart and Kroger, 500 stores are about to ditch cashiers (Between Walmart and Kroger, 500 stores are about to ditch cashiers)

Amazon Go And The 2.3 Million Cashiers It Could Leave Behind (Amazon Go And The 2.3 Million Cashiers It Could Leave Behind)

But the kinds of jobs we’ll do will be those jobs for which human labor is preferred: care givers (doctors, nurses, etc.), concierge, life coaches, majordomo, waiters, sport athletes, performers (music, theater, acting, etc.), etc.

McKinsey Global Institute's report, Skill Shift: Automation and The future of The workforce, predicts what jobs would most and least likely be automated:

  1. Higher cognitive: these skills include advanced literacy and writing, quantitative and statistical skills, critical thinking and complex information processing. Doctors, accountants, research analysts, writers and editors typically use these.
  2. Social and emotional, or so-called “soft skills”: these include advanced communication and negotiation, empathy, the ability to learn continuously, to manage others and to be adaptable. Business developmen

McKinsey Global Institute's report, Skill Shift: Automation and The future of The workforce, predicts what jobs would most and least likely be automated:

  1. Higher cognitive: these skills include advanced literacy and writing, quantitative and statistical skills, critical thinking and complex information processing. Doctors, accountants, research analysts, writers and editors typically use these.
  2. Social and emotional, or so-called “soft skills”: these include advanced communication and negotiation, empathy, the ability to learn continuously, to manage others and to be adaptable. Business development, programming, emergency response and counseling require these skills.
  3. Technological: this embraces everything from basic to advanced IT skills, data analysis, engineering and research. These are the skills that are likely to be the most highly rewarded as companies seek more software developers, engineers, robotics and scientific experts.

The report also says that workers with the following two skills sets are likely to suffer most, although not in every profession.

  1. Physical and manual skills encompass tasks that could be performed by relatively unskilled labour, such as drivers and assembly line workers, as well as skilled workers, including nurses, electricians and craftspeople.
  2. Cognitive abilities like basic literacy and numeracy are needed by workers such as cashiers, customer service staff and those involved in low-level data input and processing, such as typists and clerks.

In the coming years technology will replace millions of what were once considered the bedrock jobs of American society during the past few decades.

First let's start with one of the most common jobs for Ameican teenagers and adults which has seen an enormous decline in the last 10 years:

Retail workers.

With the invention of online shopping people have realized two things. Online stores have more variety and online stores are usually cheaper because they have less overhead. Online stores don't have to pay to rent locations in high traffic areas and they don't have to pay sales employees. What the

In the coming years technology will replace millions of what were once considered the bedrock jobs of American society during the past few decades.

First let's start with one of the most common jobs for Ameican teenagers and adults which has seen an enormous decline in the last 10 years:

Retail workers.

With the invention of online shopping people have realized two things. Online stores have more variety and online stores are usually cheaper because they have less overhead. Online stores don't have to pay to rent locations in high traffic areas and they don't have to pay sales employees. What they do have to pay is warehousing costs. Which brings me to my next point.

Warehouse worker. These jobs employ millions of people all over America and could easily be automated. Stacking and organizing boxes is the perfect job for a computer and I guarantee you someone is going to invent this technology soon, if it hasn't been invented yet, because this is a billion dollar idea.

After the products are stored and sorted they are transported around the country by millions of truck drivers, which is another job which will soon be replaced by technology. This technology already exists and for most owners of shipping companies, automated trucks should pay for themselves in less than 10 years.

Retail workers, warehouse employees and truck drivers once made up a significant portion of jobs in our economy but advances in technology has made it no longer necessary or economical for American workers to do these jobs. Some people think computer programming is going to be the job that fills this void but I think that it will be the next to go. One really good programmer is worth more than 1000 average ones.

All the highly repetitive jobs and seamingly simple jobs at huge chains will probably disappear. Why? Technology. Just take a look at what some of the scientists are currently focused on. In my experience, I am finding a lot of efforts to teach robots how to cook and interact with humans. This general breadth will be easily expanded to any repetitive task like picking up produce at the fields.

So, any job that seems relatively simple, but highly repetitive, will surely disappear in the next few years. I would love to give you an estimate, but we are moving almost too fast to say that I will be

All the highly repetitive jobs and seamingly simple jobs at huge chains will probably disappear. Why? Technology. Just take a look at what some of the scientists are currently focused on. In my experience, I am finding a lot of efforts to teach robots how to cook and interact with humans. This general breadth will be easily expanded to any repetitive task like picking up produce at the fields.

So, any job that seems relatively simple, but highly repetitive, will surely disappear in the next few years. I would love to give you an estimate, but we are moving almost too fast to say that I will be accurate.

Now, this is purely speculation, so take it or leave it. I predict that in the next 20 years, major manufacturing (companies that mass-produce goods) will have to slow down to a crawl because of our current global resources condition. Namely, we are using resources way faster than the Earth can regenerate them. I hate to be a doomsday sayer, but we are already showing characteristics of a mass extinction due to our illogical need for exotic resources instead of using community-based resources. We have broken too many food chains, and when you do so, other species die too.

I wouldn't go so far as to say any type of job won't exist in the near future, but I will make the point that retail sales people are on the way to becoming extinct. I refer to the kind of generally unskilled sales person you would find working in a store at your local shopping mall.

Indeed the whole notion of shopping malls is in serious risk of becoming extinct. There is a lot of competition from online retail outlets like Amazon and eBay. To make things worse, the government is increasing the cost to retailers for unskilled labor by increasing health care costs required by Obamacare and a

I wouldn't go so far as to say any type of job won't exist in the near future, but I will make the point that retail sales people are on the way to becoming extinct. I refer to the kind of generally unskilled sales person you would find working in a store at your local shopping mall.

Indeed the whole notion of shopping malls is in serious risk of becoming extinct. There is a lot of competition from online retail outlets like Amazon and eBay. To make things worse, the government is increasing the cost to retailers for unskilled labor by increasing health care costs required by Obamacare and also increasing minimum wages.

From the potential worker point of view I would recommend anyone who wants long term employment find some sort of skilled work to do and make every effort to acquire the required skill. For some this might mean very highly paid jobs like computer programmers or somewhat less but still well paid work such as auto mechanics or plumbers. Even jobs that require not so much skill but require the ability to pay attention and pass a drug test such as a local delivery truck driver hold a much brighter future than unskilled jobs. The notion that someone can make a meagre living doing unskilled work at stores or factories for the foreseeable future just isn't promising at all.

(Edit: yet another illiterate question—the correct word is ‘existent’)

Any job whose function can be replicated by an efficient machine will become irrelevant. Any job. Any. No exceptions.

Corporations, managers and AI/robot/machine designers are working as hard as they can to automate as much of their processes as they can, as quickly and inexpensively as possible. Investors are supporting them vigorously.

Those new machines can work 24/7 (with maintenance). They do not make mistakes (or their error rate is far lower than humans’), they don’t take time off for coffee or lunch breaks, they do not

(Edit: yet another illiterate question—the correct word is ‘existent’)

Any job whose function can be replicated by an efficient machine will become irrelevant. Any job. Any. No exceptions.

Corporations, managers and AI/robot/machine designers are working as hard as they can to automate as much of their processes as they can, as quickly and inexpensively as possible. Investors are supporting them vigorously.

Those new machines can work 24/7 (with maintenance). They do not make mistakes (or their error rate is far lower than humans’), they don’t take time off for coffee or lunch breaks, they do not form unions or go on strike, they don’t misbehave on the job or steal, they don’t talk back to managers or slack off.

This is logical, efficient and entirely intuitable. Any worker in any repetitive job that does not require original creation, real-time analysis, refined judgment and correct response will find his or her job becoming irrelevant. This is happening sooner rather than later.

You have been warned.

  • With self service checkouts becoming common, checkout chicks will disappear.
  • Taxi, bus, train, tram, and ferry operators will disappear due mostly to autonomous driving technology and the rise of services like Uber.
  • Couriers and delivery drivers, because of drones and autonomous driving.
  • Parking Wardens, yay right? No, you'll just recieve a bill in the mail like a speed camera fine :-(.
  • Production line workers, forklift drivers, truck drivers, and many warehousing jobs.
  • Bank tellers, I think banks will become more like visiting an accounting firm, or your lawyer. Many small offices with personal
  • With self service checkouts becoming common, checkout chicks will disappear.
  • Taxi, bus, train, tram, and ferry operators will disappear due mostly to autonomous driving technology and the rise of services like Uber.
  • Couriers and delivery drivers, because of drones and autonomous driving.
  • Parking Wardens, yay right? No, you'll just recieve a bill in the mail like a speed camera fine :-(.
  • Production line workers, forklift drivers, truck drivers, and many warehousing jobs.
  • Bank tellers, I think banks will become more like visiting an accounting firm, or your lawyer. Many small offices with personalised service, all done on computer.
  • I doubt airline pilots will be dumped. But maybe airforce pilots will in favour of drones operated remotely by controllers.
  • North Korean military. Sooner or later this grotesque, corrupt regime will fall.

This is an enjoyable question and I like reading the varied answers. Reality is that we are not good at predicting disruptions as we tend to think linearly. Half of the US population was involved in farming in 1900, 2 or 4% in 2000. No one was employed in the IT industry in 1950, and today it is ~20% of the economy. Back to the Future II travel forward to 2015 and there are flying cars and hoverboards, but he uses a pay phone in the diner. No one was carrying a smartphone.

In the mid1980s, meter readers were predicted to disappear with readings from trucks on streets and eventually ove

This is an enjoyable question and I like reading the varied answers. Reality is that we are not good at predicting disruptions as we tend to think linearly. Half of the US population was involved in farming in 1900, 2 or 4% in 2000. No one was employed in the IT industry in 1950, and today it is ~20% of the economy. Back to the Future II travel forward to 2015 and there are flying cars and hoverboards, but he uses a pay phone in the diner. No one was carrying a smartphone.

In the mid1980s, meter readers were predicted to disappear with readings from trucks on streets and eventually over the power lines. They are still around while many newspapers have shut their doors and journalism is radically different with bloggers. How many stores have closed as a result of online sales including Amazon's ~$80B annual revenue?

We will continue to see industry adjustments and elimination of some jobs while new industries blossom. One of the surprises today is how quickly IT is now changing and the likely disruption that will come to perfectly good people who cannot adapt to the new ways of IT.