What is your opinion on Stack Overflow?

This is a good opportunity to address some misconceptions about Stack Overflow. I am one of the earlier adopters, and had about 9,600 reputation (mostly for asking the right questions), so hopefully my observations are correct.

IT’S NOT A FORUM

Whatever you ask there must have a specific answer; hence you cannot ask questions that merely seeking an opinion (“Why do people hate PHP?”) or is subjective in nature (“Am I a good programmer”). It’s also not a place to debate, or to push an agenda.

This is why troubleshooting questions (or “why doesn’t my code work>”) questions are usually not suitable.

This is a good opportunity to address some misconceptions about Stack Overflow. I am one of the earlier adopters, and had about 9,600 reputation (mostly for asking the right questions), so hopefully my observations are correct.

IT’S NOT A FORUM

Whatever you ask there must have a specific answer; hence you cannot ask questions that merely seeking an opinion (“Why do people hate PHP?”) or is subjective in nature (“Am I a good programmer”). It’s also not a place to debate, or to push an agenda.

This is why troubleshooting questions (or “why doesn’t my code work>”) questions are usually not suitable. Code don’t work for many reasons, and sometimes it’s not the code itself that is problematic but perhaps an environment variable or a configuration setting somewhere. Stack Overflow is not suitable for this kind of back and forth.

IT’S NOT FOR BEGINNERS

There’s a minimal entry of barrier to Stack Overflow which is unspoken; the site is meant for intermediate developers who already know what they are doing, and are stuck on a point of understanding, badly written documentation or needing to find a work-around. If your questions are within the realms of IF statements, how to write a for-next, etc. etc., you’re better for asking at a forum that carters to new-comers, such as Udemy courses.

STACK OVERFLOW RESPECTS EFFORT

Questions that show a lack of effort get downvoted. Questions that aren’t clear as to what they need answer get downvoted. Questions that are blatantly homework get downvoted. You can ask homework questions, but showing the work you have in progress usually gathers more respect.

The site also respect effort in formatting the questions, using proper English and asking nicely.

STACK OVERFLOW WANTS TO BE A REFERENCE

Hence it hates duplicated questions and why general trouble-shooting questions (“Why won’t this code works”) tends to get ignored. The more general your case is, the more suitable a fit it can be. That’s the difficulty of asking good questions on StackOverflow - it can’t be specifically just your problem but it can’t be too general such that it is not helpful at all.

As an example, supposed you using library XYZ of a certain popular programming language ABC. You want to say transform a date from one timezone to another. Here’s how you can ask questions on StackOverflow.

Bad: “Why doesn’t this piece of code work?” + code snippet: You are asking the people to determine what you want — read the code, figure out what you want to do, then suggest corrections. Worse still, it is not searchable — others who have the same issue as you won’t be able to find the question.

Somewhat Better: “Why can’t I transform my date to a different timezone” + code snippet provided — good, but still lacking in context.

Good, could be better: “Why can’t I transform my date to a different timezone using XYZ in ABC?” - people looking at the title knows exactly what you want…

Better than Most: As above, with details on what you have tried “I tried with two different timezones, and they give the expected output” and what you have double checked “I have double-checked that time format was correctly”, and including details of your experiment.

IT’S MEANT FOR ENGINEERS

Programming being what it is, Stack Overflow is likely to be filled with “C” personality types (using the DISC model). A down-vote simply means “your question is not suitable here”, not “You are a horrible, ignorant, person for asking this question here, and this down-vote is to shame you so that you will cry alone while huddling in the corner, questioning your worth as a human being”. Answers also get down-voted if people think the answer promotes bad practice or is out-dated.

MY OPINIONS

That said, I think Stack Overflow has sort of lost its luster for me. Reasons are:

  • It has gotten too nitpicky. Suppose I have an optimization issue with A* algorithm implemented in C++ for a turn-based strategy game. Does it go to Stack Overflow, GameDev.Stack Overflow or Programmer.Stack Overflow?
  • The quality of questions have dropped. In it heydays there were interesting questions asked, but now no more. Perhaps all the interesting questions have been asked and all that, or the site is too popular and the signal-to-noise ratio is low. Now at least half the questions on the first page of Stack Overflow are troubleshooting questions.

    Looking at back at my highest contribution (in terms of questions and answers), they mostly deal with algorithms, design patterns and software engineering. I suspect part of the reason of the overall drop in questions quality is that those topics have been shipped off elsewhere (probably http://programmer.stackexchange.com). If you look at the list of “featured” questions, most of the highly voted one deals with AI (Prolog) and algorithms (and I wonder why aren’t those shipped over to the Programmer’s Stack Exchange site instead. Like I said, it has gotten too confusing).

Two cent worth, as usual.

A lot of the issues that people have with stack overflow is how it’s used. As someone who has taught programming classes and seen people abuse it, I can probably guess what happened.

1) You Need to Understand What You’re Asking

Most of the questions I see on Stack Overflow are from people who don’t understand the problem. My favorite is the person who wanted to create a regex to parse HTML and couldn’t figure out how to do it. The reason they couldn’t figure out how to do it deals with the fact that he didn’t understand that HTML is not a regular language and the implications that has. As a resu

A lot of the issues that people have with stack overflow is how it’s used. As someone who has taught programming classes and seen people abuse it, I can probably guess what happened.

1) You Need to Understand What You’re Asking

Most of the questions I see on Stack Overflow are from people who don’t understand the problem. My favorite is the person who wanted to create a regex to parse HTML and couldn’t figure out how to do it. The reason they couldn’t figure out how to do it deals with the fact that he didn’t understand that HTML is not a regular language and the implications that has. As a result they completely ignored everyone who said it wasn’t possible to create a regex for standard HTML.

2) Questions Could be Answered in Less Time Than it Takes to Ask the Question

When a new user joins they typically ask a Programming 101 question that can be answered by opening a book or Googling the question. This is related to 1 above. As an example my Quora feed lists this topic:

What is the fastest algorithm to find the largest number in an unsorted array?

This is a really really stupid question. There are three Stack Overflow questions on this exact topic and a little bit of thought on the question will provide the answer. As a result a question like this will either be ignored or answered Socratically. One issue with the Socratic method is it tends to point out holes in a persons knowledge. They can either learn from it, or more frequently take it as a personal attack and get angry.

3) You’re NOT Going to be Spoonfed an Answer

This is the problem I see most often on internet forums and people get very angry when this doesn’t happen on Stack Overflow. It started off as a group of experienced programmers asking complicated questions that take some thought to resolve and usually have more than one answer. Many times new users get upset because they ask a question on Stack Overflow and expect a response that can be easily converted to code. Usually a general explanation is provided, which if you understand the question and answer is easy enough to implement with some work. A large number of people will go to Stack Overflow and ask a homework question verbatim hoping for a quick answer. I have seen some of the exercises I’ve given appear on Stack Overflow. This is a sign of someone who really doesn’t care about understanding and just wants someone else to do the work for them.

4) People Rarely Understand the Answers that are Provided or That They Give

This is something I frequently see in the classes I teach. Someone will frequently look on Stack Overflow for a solution to a problem. As a result they find something that looks like what they’re doing a long with a piece of sample code. Rather than trying to understand the solution and implementing it themselves they copy the code into there own work and try to fit what they’re doing around the Stack Overflow answer. This usually works out badly and they blame Stack Overflow. I see this frequently with systems code. Someone will have to implement something that spawns a new thread and they use the wrong exec() call. The thing crashes and they blame it on a bad answer rather than the fact that there are different types of exec() calls. Conversely someone will have something they kind of got working and will try to answer a question they don’t understand with code they don’t understand. When this happens others will frequently point out obvious shortcomings, and again the person answering will take it as a personal attack rather than an attack on their limited knowledge.

5) Stack Overflow Should be Used as an Advanced Reference System

This is basically combining everything above. You should visit Stack Overflow if you have a question of significant complexity that has several valid answers. If you’ve only been programming for a few years I seriously doubt that you’ve run across anything that hasn’t been answered a dozen times elsewhere. Computer Science is more than 75 years old, a lot of problems have come up and been solved in that time. Unlike a forum like Quora where handholding is the norm, many on Stack Overflow will expect you to act professionally. Asking a question that’s answered in most textbooks will bring swift retribution because it is incredibly unprofessional.

Finally, many people take what happens on Stack Overflow as a personal attack as you’ve done. It isn’t a personal attack, the folks who are on Stack Overflow are just as happy to answer a difficult question as they are to point out the flaws in your reasoning. It’s likely that if you had some more experience and/or knowledge you could have handled everything on your own, and that’s what they’re trying to point out. Though to be fair there are some that go a little overboard in this regard.

me personally I think it's pure crap, they treat new users like a scumbag and downvote your good questions because they don't like new programmers what's the point?

Let me guess what happened…

  1. You joined the site.
  2. You then asked a fast question without reading Help Center or other rules.
  3. And, even faster, your question was downvoted, closed or maybe even deleted.
  4. Before that, you got a few comments like “Unclear what you are asking,” “what have you tried?”, “Search on Google first,” “Can you please be more specific” etc.
  5. You got pissed off because you thought they didn’t like you.
  6. You came to Quora…
  7. A

me personally I think it's pure crap, they treat new users like a scumbag and downvote your good questions because they don't like new programmers what's the point?

Let me guess what happened…

  1. You joined the site.
  2. You then asked a fast question without reading Help Center or other rules.
  3. And, even faster, your question was downvoted, closed or maybe even deleted.
  4. Before that, you got a few comments like “Unclear what you are asking,” “what have you tried?”, “Search on Google first,” “Can you please be more specific” etc.
  5. You got pissed off because you thought they didn’t like you.
  6. You came to Quora…
  7. And asked this question.

I’m quite sure this has happened to a lot of users in Stack Overflow. However, believe me, if this has happened, 95 out of 100 times its your question’s fault.

Stack Overflow has one of the most democratic communities on the Internet. If a question get closed, downvoted or deleted, that’s because your question is probably not clear enough, it doesn’t include an example that is concise yet complete, or the solution can be found easily with a small search on Google. There are tons of off-topics that are not a fit for Stack Overflow.

I signed up there to get good answers from my questions and not to get critsm

Sorry but if you can’t handle criticism, don’t use the Internet. Criticism is usually a good thing. You can be aware of what might be wrong with you. On the other hand, Stack Overflow does not care who you are, your color, religion, gender, nation, language, etc. They only care if your question or answer is good/right.

After factoring in the critical suggestions, if you still think your question has some troubles, you can always ask it on Meta Stack Overflow to get better information about it. From What is "meta"? How does it work? - Help Center: “Meta Stack Overflow is the part of the site where users discuss the workings and policies of Stack Overflow rather than discussing programming itself.”

I strongly suspect, you take those downvotes or criticism as a personal attack. Don’t. It is not. It is all about your question.

I think it has lost its way and no longer serves the developer community to the degree it did when it was new.

A premise behind Stack Overflow was gamification. Thus it is dominated by people who are there to play games.

  • Badge collectors
  • Self-appointed police
  • Amateur bureaucrats
  • Amateur encyclopaedists

What’s worse than a professional bureaucrat? An amateur bureaucrat. They don’t stop at five. And the only thing worse than an amateur bureaucrat is an amateur bureaucrat on a holy mission. Stack Overflow has these in droves.

I have given up trying to reason with them. Whenever I challenge their conduct

I think it has lost its way and no longer serves the developer community to the degree it did when it was new.

A premise behind Stack Overflow was gamification. Thus it is dominated by people who are there to play games.

  • Badge collectors
  • Self-appointed police
  • Amateur bureaucrats
  • Amateur encyclopaedists

What’s worse than a professional bureaucrat? An amateur bureaucrat. They don’t stop at five. And the only thing worse than an amateur bureaucrat is an amateur bureaucrat on a holy mission. Stack Overflow has these in droves.

I have given up trying to reason with them. Whenever I challenge their conduct or policy the response is “blah blah blah rules/policy”. That’s the same as saying “We don’t run SO for you, we don’t care whether you find it useful.”

An oft-quoted rationale for the rules of Stack Overflow is the premise that they are curating a giant on-line Q+A resource. This is why they have endless discussions about tags and such. The tags themselves are certainly useful, for example in scoping the set of new questions for those who make a hobby of answering them.

However, search is another matter. Crowd-sourced curation versus machine indexed free-text search is Yahoo versus Google. Ya-who? As for the tags, they can be machine generated. Search engines already do this to allow them to match concepts rather than words. So the whole curation thing is utterly pointless. Machines already do it better, and they do it without pissing off people who are trying to use the site as a collaborative learning system.

Some people go further than collaborative learning and really abuse the system by trying to get free outsourcing: please debug my code. URGENT!!! PLZ SEND TEH CODEZ!!! but this is a problem that solves itself: they get ignored. This is one thing I do like about Stack Overflow that machines can’t do: users can grade the quality/interest level of a question or response, and this weights the materiel for search engine ranking.

I still use SO out of necessity. From time to time I get so vexed with them that I seriously contemplate setting up an alternative. This always leads to the same conclusion: it won’t work, and if it did I wouldn’t have the time and couldn’t afford to run the servers or pay for that much cloud.

Microsoft has the time and the resources and does in fact provide something along the same lines. The main shortcomings of this are

  • Limited to the Microsoft universe.
  • Nowhere near as many eyeballs see your question.
  • The UI isn’t as slick or sophisticated as SO.

While not as slick it has potential. It has the key feature: user grading of questions and answers. If it were heavily used Microsoft might well commit more resources.

If your questions relate to Microsoft tech and you have had a gutful of Stack Overflow attitudes then this is your best hope. As for the limitation to things Microsoft, that’s a very large part of the commercial development universe and as far as I’m concerned the Linux people and the SO community deserve each other.

In a previous version of this answer I describe it as a ghost town. That’s relative to SO. Recently I had to write a mouse driver. That’s seriously esoteric stuff, and the further you get from mainstream the less useful SO is. In desperation I posted a question on the above site and in no time at all I had a useful if rather terse response from the guy who heads the driver team at Microsoft.

Stack Overflow is a-ma-zing. Frankly, I don’t know how people would ever be able to figure anything out with it. (Actually, I do know - it’d be read the manual, which most of the time is impossibly complex and inscrutable. Although, thanks to SO I’m actually now becoming better at RTM.)

That being said, as with every community, there are always ‘those’ people who try to make themselves feel less insecure by kicking sand in the faces of others - downvoting stuff, telling people to RTFM, pointing out how things are ‘obvious’ when they’re obviously not, etc. However, there’s surprisingly little of

Stack Overflow is a-ma-zing. Frankly, I don’t know how people would ever be able to figure anything out with it. (Actually, I do know - it’d be read the manual, which most of the time is impossibly complex and inscrutable. Although, thanks to SO I’m actually now becoming better at RTM.)

That being said, as with every community, there are always ‘those’ people who try to make themselves feel less insecure by kicking sand in the faces of others - downvoting stuff, telling people to RTFM, pointing out how things are ‘obvious’ when they’re obviously not, etc. However, there’s surprisingly little of that, probably due to Be nice. - Help Center (which is awesome) and the fact you can ‘flag’ people who are not… being nice! (I’ve done so a couple times and the not-nice comments have been yanked.)

I find that reputation is a tough thing. I do my best to participate, but it’s really hard to get points, unless you’re amazing yourself. In 2010 someone could post “How do I convert a float to an int” and today both the question and answer would have earned hundreds of upvotes. Do a search today for unanswered questions and… good luck! If there’s anything remotely easy to answer in there it’ll be answered in minutes. I’ve gotten points from just a few esoteric things. However, reputation shouldn’t, and doesn’t, really have an impact on your ability to benefit from the site - it seems mostly for fun.

I’d suggest following the advice on this page and giving it another try. Best of luck!

What's your opinion on Stack Overflow?

Good. The best resource for programmers in the Internet.

I think it's pure crap.

Others don't.

They treat new users like a scumbag

Yes. It may seem so for you. It seems to be the best they can do to maintain quality, and it's working.

...and downvote your good questions.

Any question you ask seems good to you. But may seem not to others. Welcome to life.

They don't like new programmers.

Yes. It may seem so. But why not question what do new programmers do to provoke them?

I signed up there to get good answers for my questions and not to get criticism.

Welcome to life

What's your opinion on Stack Overflow?

Good. The best resource for programmers in the Internet.

I think it's pure crap.

Others don't.

They treat new users like a scumbag

Yes. It may seem so for you. It seems to be the best they can do to maintain quality, and it's working.

...and downvote your good questions.

Any question you ask seems good to you. But may seem not to others. Welcome to life.

They don't like new programmers.

Yes. It may seem so. But why not question what do new programmers do to provoke them?

I signed up there to get good answers for my questions and not to get criticism.

Welcome to life again. If you call for help, and it looks like you didn't do your homework, expect criticism.

Now. In more detail.

I consider Stack Overflow to be the best resource for programmers because of its collective, collaborative, self-criticising nature. Of course, such nature is not beginner-friendly. But features like voting, and accepted answers save the beginner from comparison.

Left is the problem of harsh moderation. It's a controversial problem indeed, that you may read tough opinions like yours (albeit better in argument, sorry) on it throughout the Internet. However, it works. So, it's unlikely for them to accept such change as long as the site is successful.

Finally, let's not ignore the low quality of questions you may see from new users. The quality of those questions makes you think that little to no effort was done before asking. Personally, I don't ask a new question before trying out all my best. I may get to the tenth page in a Google search. I may repeat the search with different keywords. I may try alternative solutions to my problem. I may ask a colleague or a friend. Asking a new question is only after reaching a dead end.

SO is superb as a resource for programmers, if you follow the rules. Asking a ‘how do I’ programming question without showing some code to demonstrate that you at least tried to come up with a solution on your own will immediately get your question down-voted and probably will evoke angry feedback. The reason for the down-vote is simple. Most likely it means you have:

  • asked a question without showing any code, which means you either haven’t written any code yet ( inexcusable ), or you think your code is so special that you don’t want to share it ( hint, if you are asking for help, your code pro

SO is superb as a resource for programmers, if you follow the rules. Asking a ‘how do I’ programming question without showing some code to demonstrate that you at least tried to come up with a solution on your own will immediately get your question down-voted and probably will evoke angry feedback. The reason for the down-vote is simple. Most likely it means you have:

  • asked a question without showing any code, which means you either haven’t written any code yet ( inexcusable ), or you think your code is so special that you don’t want to share it ( hint, if you are asking for help, your code probably isn’t that special )
  • asked a question that you could have answered yourself by copying the question into the search bar on your browser

In other words, you were lazy. Too lazy to at least do a google search before troubling others with your problem is lazy enough to warrant a rebuke.

Having said that, there is no good reason for the level of vitriol displayed by some of its members. The anti-social behavior is, sadly, part of its culture. Nothing like a community run by a bunch of nerdy boy-men. And don’t ever tell them they are running a community, they will tell you that you don’t understand their purpose and mission. All of which they will tell you in a ‘hangout’ room or meta discussion. Because, you know, those things don’t demonstrate community behavior.

The bad behavior has long been a core problem of a technical community that is 70–80% men, some of whom apparently didn’t have their mothers teach them proper manners. Until places like SO become more balanced by an injection of much-needed estrogen, that’s what you are in for.

If you want to use SO, develop some thicker skin, put your ego aside, do your homework, and don’t treat it like a help desk. Whatever the social shortcomings of its members, SO is home to some exceptionally smart people who can help you solve all kinds of problems.

Peter Wone makes some good points about the gamification of the site and how it affects use patterns.

They don’t like new programmers

I’d call making such an absurd assumption pure cr..whatever you said.

I signed up there to get good answers from my questions and not criticism.

Are you under the impression that contributors to Stack Overflow are paid or otherwise compensated to answer questions? Oh, no. They do so out of an interest in solving thought-provoking questions on programming. There are enough resources that can answer routine questions and a simple Google search can provide you these in a couple of seconds. Do you think anyone who is taking time out to contribute some knowledge would w

They don’t like new programmers

I’d call making such an absurd assumption pure cr..whatever you said.

I signed up there to get good answers from my questions and not criticism.

Are you under the impression that contributors to Stack Overflow are paid or otherwise compensated to answer questions? Oh, no. They do so out of an interest in solving thought-provoking questions on programming. There are enough resources that can answer routine questions and a simple Google search can provide you these in a couple of seconds. Do you think anyone who is taking time out to contribute some knowledge would want to waste some of it reiterating stuff that enough has been said of already?

Look, I’m a beginner programmer too. I admit there can be a few users of SO who may be condescending or sarcastic when accosted by the umpteenth version of an oft-repeated query - but understand this: good questions add as much value to the forum as good answers do - this is true of Quora too. Thus, it is the responsibility of the question poster to make sure that the question would not just solve his immediate concern, but also have the potential to be of help to future visitors to the site.

So, in a nutshell -

  • Don’t ask questions that a simple Google search can answer. You don’t want a “LMGTFY” and neither does anyone else.
  • Don’t ask questions that have already been adequately addressed on SO. They add no value to the site.
  • Don’t ask questions with incomplete or insufficient details and expect “good answers”. No contributor has the time to guess what you need. No contributor is a magician, either.
  • Do mention what you have already tried to solve the problem. This can help contributors recognize where you’re making mistakes with your method of solving it. Contributors don’t intend to do your work for you, they want to help you crack a problem that is puzzling to you and might br puzzling to other programmers in rhe future. No one’s going to consent to writing your code for you.

TL;DR: SO is a great site and all of us newbies ought to be grateful for it. Think about the times when programmers had nothing to rely on to help them with perplexing problems apart from formal textbooks and their own ingenuity.

It happened to me. So many times…
And, at first, I also ragequit SO, because people were closing questions, sometimes deleting them, it hurts our feeling.
At first, I was just reading answers, finding solutions. I wanted to thank the people who took the time to write those solution at some point, and I created an account… Just to find out I couldn’t even write a comment. I got really pissed of because of this, it was like “how am I supposed to get points? I can’t even write a fucking comment? Can’t downvote, etc.”
I wasn’t writing good English either, and it was “hard” to ask a question or ans

It happened to me. So many times…
And, at first, I also ragequit SO, because people were closing questions, sometimes deleting them, it hurts our feeling.
At first, I was just reading answers, finding solutions. I wanted to thank the people who took the time to write those solution at some point, and I created an account… Just to find out I couldn’t even write a comment. I got really pissed of because of this, it was like “how am I supposed to get points? I can’t even write a fucking comment? Can’t downvote, etc.”
I wasn’t writing good English either, and it was “hard” to ask a question or answer in English, meaning I had to spend some time to put the words together, just to see the question gets downvoted, loose reputation so hardly earned.

I stayed under 100 reputation for quite some time. Couldn’t even upvote others post at first; it got unlocked at 15 reputation (see Privileges).
Then, I wrote helpful answers (it’s very hard! because there are so many smart people on Stack Overflow who know way more things than me and explain it so much better, usually, especially at first).
But I stuck to it and kept using it. I got 100 rep and unlocked the 100 rep on other Q&A websites (it wasn’t before and it was a pain in the ass to get up the reputation there too…)

I got more involved and wrote more and more questions & answers. Reputation went up. More privileges unlocked and such, life got easier.

Once, I stand up in Meta in a discussion, because I remembered how hard it was for me to get started on Stack Overflow. I opened two questions on Meta and got downvoted so much.
Discussion about pro and cons for allowing up-voting to very new users
Ideas to help new users to get involved in the community

On all the Q&A sites, Meta is the only one I have under 100 reputation. See User Vadorequest - Stack Exchange
I understood then (due to the answers I got in Meta) why it was such a pain at first:
I should have done peer-review to get more reputation and unlock more privileges.
Thing is: I didn’t know it was the smart move to do.

My advice is to read those two threads; you’ll probably see your own frustration through my questions there. I tried to improve Stack Overflow, but it wasn’t the way the community liked it. I see their point; I don’t always like it though.

Today, I’m close to 2.5k reputation, I unlocked my first gold badge on Stack Overflow this morning after more than three years. I get to review Q&A and edit them through peer-review, I get to be useful to the community. But it wasn’t easy at all and a lot of my friends from high-school who used Stack Overflow like me and wanted to upvote useful answers would still be stuck at <50 reputation if we hadn’t upvoted each other at some point. (even though it’s against the rules, of course. We did it once, so they could upvote. One of them got much more rep then; he was just stuck at the beginning, as I was).

Stack Overflow/Q&A are awesome. The quality is awesome, the people also are, and it comes at a price. People who won’t spend time to be part of the community… Won’t be part of the community.

Hope it helps! :)

Stack Overflow is a ridiculous website, I had the misfortune of going there when I was new and it almost ruined my interest in programming:

Here’s the deal,, if your question gets 1 downvote, you’re banned, simple as that.

Now consider this, over half of stack overflow is 30–40 year olds going through a midlife crisis who do nothing but 3 things on stack overflow:

1.) Downvote a post when they feel its too basic for them, as they feel personally challenged

2.) Downvote a post when they feel its too advanced for them, as they feel intellectually challenged

3.) Downvote a post when they feel its too

Stack Overflow is a ridiculous website, I had the misfortune of going there when I was new and it almost ruined my interest in programming:

Here’s the deal,, if your question gets 1 downvote, you’re banned, simple as that.

Now consider this, over half of stack overflow is 30–40 year olds going through a midlife crisis who do nothing but 3 things on stack overflow:

1.) Downvote a post when they feel its too basic for them, as they feel personally challenged

2.) Downvote a post when they feel its too advanced for them, as they feel intellectually challenged

3.) Downvote a post when they feel its too much at their level, cause come on, you need to come out of your comfort zone once in a while, isn’t it?

Does stack overflow do anything to check the validity of its downvotes? nope, they couldn’t care less. Caring about your product’s users would be a bit too much too ask for a bunch of snobs, wouldn’t it?

If you don’t agree with me, I advise you to keep your downvoting business exclusively on stackoverflow only(I am 100% sure you won’t agree with this advice, I can also assure you I care about that about as much as stackoverflow cares about it’s new contributors :p)

All the best on your stack overflow journey, if, after one month, youre both still on stack overflow and still programming, you’ve got some patience! xD

Should perhaps add: my experience with math stackexchange has been much better.

Mixed feelings. Most of the time I don't like it. As most have said you join to ask a question and as soon as you ask the question it's downvoted and you feel like crap. I'm sorry but not everyone is Einstein!! You honestly expect us to know everything about a language??

Furthermore if your answer doesn't get downvoted some answers that are given are just utter rubbish. Some people just give links to documentation, like seriously do you honestly think I haven't read that yet!!? I don't understand what it means that why I'm asking the question!

Not all users but some are just so stuck up and thin

Mixed feelings. Most of the time I don't like it. As most have said you join to ask a question and as soon as you ask the question it's downvoted and you feel like crap. I'm sorry but not everyone is Einstein!! You honestly expect us to know everything about a language??

Furthermore if your answer doesn't get downvoted some answers that are given are just utter rubbish. Some people just give links to documentation, like seriously do you honestly think I haven't read that yet!!? I don't understand what it means that why I'm asking the question!

Not all users but some are just so stuck up and think they're utter genius. I mean you're on a forum answering questions if you're so smart why ain't you furthering the field?? It's like they take some pleasure being mean to new comers.

However, on the other hand when you look up something to remind yourself on how to do it, it comes in handy. Rather than trying to recall something it's good to just type your problem into google and the solution comes up right away.

In general it has good intentions it's just sad how some of the users take the terms of service just too far. Since I joined quora though I have no regrets from not using it. Users are much better here.