What backend language should I use with Firebase?

I’ve been using Firebase for a while and you DO need a back-end language at some point, for example to handle online payments, you can’t have your keys stored in the client.

I was asking myself the same questions so I asked one of firebase’s co-founders and he said node.js basically because node is JS so you can do npm install firebase and use the firebase JS SDK to work with node :-)

The great thing about Backend development is that you’re separating your concerns. The thing is, your app and website doesn't actually care what language your server was programmed with - only the accuracy/usability of the JSON Api you’re delivering.

Firebase is a little different, due to its libraries. I would recommend Node.JS if you want to use Firebase, it’s got some great tooling and tight coupling with Firebase. Just remember - you don't have to use a backend language! You can use a 100% client side solution if you want.

Here’s a link to a helpful post that should help you out: with this d

The great thing about Backend development is that you’re separating your concerns. The thing is, your app and website doesn't actually care what language your server was programmed with - only the accuracy/usability of the JSON Api you’re delivering.

Firebase is a little different, due to its libraries. I would recommend Node.JS if you want to use Firebase, it’s got some great tooling and tight coupling with Firebase. Just remember - you don't have to use a backend language! You can use a 100% client side solution if you want.

Here’s a link to a helpful post that should help you out: with this decision:

Where does Firebase fit in your app?

Hope this helps : )

Until you are absolutely satisfied that Firebase’s new and incredibly exciting Cloud Functions won’t serve your needs, don’t even think about anything else.

Cloud Functions makes a kind of sense with Firebase that no other technology does for providing full-strength backend logic to a Firebase project/DB. And the “pay as you go” model is the cutting edge of cloud services today — right out of the Amazon playbook. This is something really worth grabbing with both hands if you have any good reason to do so.

By the way — great YouTube videos from the Firebase team on this subject.

Angular js, typescript.

For my little time in software development ,I've also realised that other server languages such as php can be given the power to perform No-SQL transactions . This is possible by using decoding and encoding functions .

For example ,JSON file can be fetched into an array and converted to sql compatible data where else in the other side ,mysql structure can be decoded and stored as a JSON file.

Encoding functuins lets you fetch data in a format you desire.

The code below illustrates an API that fetches data from a http JSON format decodes it and encodes it .

  1. data: {
  2. authenticat

Angular js, typescript.

For my little time in software development ,I've also realised that other server languages such as php can be given the power to perform No-SQL transactions . This is possible by using decoding and encoding functions .

For example ,JSON file can be fetched into an array and converted to sql compatible data where else in the other side ,mysql structure can be decoded and stored as a JSON file.

Encoding functuins lets you fetch data in a format you desire.

The code below illustrates an API that fetches data from a http JSON format decodes it and encodes it .

  1. data: {
  2. authenticate: true
  3. }
  4. })
  5. page-inscriptionnewsletter.php
  6. <?php /* Template Name: Inscription newsletter mobile */ ?> <?php get_template_part('templates/header'); ?>
  7. <?php if (have_posts()) : ?>
  8. <?php while (have_posts()) : the_post(); ?>
  9. <h1 class="title-post"><?php the_title(); ?></h1>
  10. <?php the_breadcrumb(); ?>
  11. <div class="content-post">
  12. <?php
  13. $data = json_decode(file_get_contents("php://input"));
  14. $email = mysql_real_escape_string($data->email);
  15. $qry = 'INSERT INTO lcdjwp_newsletter (email) values ("'.$email.'")';
  16. $qry_res = mysql_query($qry);
  17. if ($qry_res) {
  18. $arr = array('msg' => "Email Created Successfully!!!", 'error' => '');
  19. $jsn = json_encode($arr);
  20. print_r($jsn);
  21. } else {
  22. $arr = array('msg' => "", 'error' => 'Error In inserting');
  23. $jsn = json_encode($arr);
  24. print_r($jsn);
  25. }
  26. ?>

Regards.

It depends on what features you need and what your skills are.

If you’re fluent in python already, then that works fine for most purposes (that’s what I use for my backend programming in my Firebase project).

If you’re fluent in javascript or node already, then that might be a better choice.

There are also occasional different capabilities between the REST API and the Javascript API so if you need something which is in one and not the other, then that might constrain your choice.

This is not quite a valid question, and here’s why.

It doesn’t matter what programming language you use with Firebase, all languages (web servers in this case) make API calls to your firebase account to retrieve objects (JSON objects, which is data stored in a key-value pair format). All programming languages can parse (as in - understand) JSON objects (and if they don’t, there is almost always a library in that language which offers parsing for you).

So to say you should use 1 programming language over another for a service that offers you data in a universally understood format is kind of odd.

This is not quite a valid question, and here’s why.

It doesn’t matter what programming language you use with Firebase, all languages (web servers in this case) make API calls to your firebase account to retrieve objects (JSON objects, which is data stored in a key-value pair format). All programming languages can parse (as in - understand) JSON objects (and if they don’t, there is almost always a library in that language which offers parsing for you).

So to say you should use 1 programming language over another for a service that offers you data in a universally understood format is kind of odd.

The better question to ask would perhaps be - what Database structure would you use with a certain application, and what programming language you would use with a certain application, and that depends on the application itself. There is no 1 best choice for all applications.

Side note - you could argue that web servers which use javascript on the back-end may benefit from using a firebase database server, but that minor benefit rarely outweighs the decision you make on the programming language based on the application itself.

Pro’s:

1. If your app does run of a centralized DB, and is updated by a lot of

users – then it’s more than capable of handling the Real-Time data

updates between devices.

2. Stored in the cloud so readily available everywhere.

3. Cross Platform API (If you are using this DB with an App)

4. They Host the data. -Meaning if you are storing a lot of data, you don’t have to worry about hardware!

Con’s:

1. Unless your app runs of one centralized database updated by a vast quantity of users, it’s a major overkill.

2. Storage format is entirely different to that of SQL, (Firebase uses JSON) so you wouldn’t be

Pro’s:

1. If your app does run of a centralized DB, and is updated by a lot of

users – then it’s more than capable of handling the Real-Time data

updates between devices.

2. Stored in the cloud so readily available everywhere.

3. Cross Platform API (If you are using this DB with an App)

4. They Host the data. -Meaning if you are storing a lot of data, you don’t have to worry about hardware!

Con’s:

1. Unless your app runs of one centralized database updated by a vast quantity of users, it’s a major overkill.

2. Storage format is entirely different to that of SQL, (Firebase uses JSON) so you wouldn’t be able to migrate that easily.

3. Reporting tools won’t be anywhere near the ones of standard SQL.

4. Costs! -Limited to 50 Connections and 100mb of Storage!

5. You don’t host the data, Firebase does. And depending on which server you get put on, viewing there up time there seems to be a lot of disruption lately.

Read more at: What are the advantages and disadvantages of Firebase for a database? - FAQs System

From one perspective, you could say you are, since you’re writing an app that includes a “full stack”. However, when a potential employer wants to know if you’re a “full-stack developer”, what they’re asking is “Can you write both front-end and back-end code?”

When the backend code is hidden behind an abstraction layer — whether or not that’s a hosted or local service — that your code doesn’t touch, you’re not writing full-stack. You’d be doing yourself quite a disservice to stand on philosophical semantics about “What is ‘full stack’, really?” instead of recognising the question actually being

From one perspective, you could say you are, since you’re writing an app that includes a “full stack”. However, when a potential employer wants to know if you’re a “full-stack developer”, what they’re asking is “Can you write both front-end and back-end code?”

When the backend code is hidden behind an abstraction layer — whether or not that’s a hosted or local service — that your code doesn’t touch, you’re not writing full-stack. You’d be doing yourself quite a disservice to stand on philosophical semantics about “What is ‘full stack’, really?” instead of recognising the question actually being asked.

If you say “yes” before you’ve allowed yourself to gain the skills that are being discussed, you’ll find yourself in a very uncomfortable position.

Learning full-stack development is easy: the most difficult part is keeping disciplined with regard to which layer should perform different tasks. Take on a small side project and learn it! It’ll pay dividends when the time comes to try explaining to a potential employer why you’re “really a full-stack developer” even though you’ve never written a SQL query, or even server-side code.