What are some beginner-friendly Stack Overflow alternatives?

I tend to look to forums and of course, Quora. As most of the questions I ask are of a coding nature, and as time has gone on, I have les and less need to ask, I feel that I can answer more and more. there may be Forums and sites that specialise in a particulr subject matter that you are looking for and often they have search functionality, try these to see if you can find an answer to your question, always post in the question that you are a newbie in that field and that you have tried X, Y and Z first, if people can see the method of your approach to a sticky situation that you are in they

I tend to look to forums and of course, Quora. As most of the questions I ask are of a coding nature, and as time has gone on, I have les and less need to ask, I feel that I can answer more and more. there may be Forums and sites that specialise in a particulr subject matter that you are looking for and often they have search functionality, try these to see if you can find an answer to your question, always post in the question that you are a newbie in that field and that you have tried X, Y and Z first, if people can see the method of your approach to a sticky situation that you are in they can often point out where you are either going wrong or provide you with an outright answer.

One of the things I have noticed (in my own experience that is) is if I ever asked a straight out question I would not actually learn anything. Instead i often ask if I am going wrong at a particulr point, am I going in the right direction but I ask for pointers to areas of the net where i can discover the answer for myself.

The 'one ask, one answer, one shot' method tends not to stick in my mind, whereas if I ask where I can find an answwer, or learn the answer myself I am more likely to rememebr the answer in the future.


Stack overflow have their own Idea of what is and what isnt a 'Good' question, but as some famous guy once said, 'There are no stupid questions', in the same vein as 'Who Wants to be a millionaire' its only easy if you know the answer, SO seems to forget this and also forgets that everyone has to start somewhere and what appears to be a stupid question to one person is a difficult and thorny problem for another.

A case in question is when I took my degree it took me 6 weeks to create a particular form with validation, a few years ago I remmeber knocking up the same thing in about 20 minutes, yet that first time it was one of the hardest problems I had ever done in my life (I only began coding at the age of 33) but with experience and repetition I dont even think about how to do it, I know it is done in a particular way for me.

Another thing to remember isif you ask 100 developers to create a snippet, you are likely to 150 different ways of doing it

I hope this helps.

While I agree that SO is intimidating to n00bs, but it is Tough love.

Couple of things people at Stackflow love to see:

  1. Have you done enough research on what you are asking? So, learn to use Google before shooting questions at StackOverflow.
  2. Show the efforts that you made. I will be upset and downvote if I see you are pasting your homework question without showing that you have tried and failed.
  3. SSCCE (short, self contained, compilable example): People will love to analyze if you make a short example of your code and ask what's wrong with it.


source: The infamous Not Born Yesterday

Here is wh

While I agree that SO is intimidating to n00bs, but it is Tough love.

Couple of things people at Stackflow love to see:

  1. Have you done enough research on what you are asking? So, learn to use Google before shooting questions at StackOverflow.
  2. Show the efforts that you made. I will be upset and downvote if I see you are pasting your homework question without showing that you have tried and failed.
  3. SSCCE (short, self contained, compilable example): People will love to analyze if you make a short example of your code and ask what's wrong with it.


source: The infamous Not Born Yesterday

Here is what people hate on StackOverflow:

  1. Cliche: Unlike Quora, people hate to answer something that can be easily found on StackOverflow or searching the keyword in Google. But then again, people like me just mark it close with a link to a previously answered exactly same question.
  2. Take for granted: People love to help you out, just do not make them work for what you are paid. Ask clearly, and precisely what your problem is, just do not go around and try to close issues in your bug tracker via people answering on SO.


Also, do not take negative votes, comments with sarcasm, or closed questions as personal offence. They are more like a feedback to improve the quality of your questions -- nothing more, nothing less. StackOverflow is fun and probably a good place for n00bs unless you are a sissy.

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Also, to all the people who do not know the world before StackOverflow. There used to be forums for specific technology. Places like Sun Java Forum (now dead),
Java Forums at the Big Moose Saloon, MySQL forum, Oracle forum, in fact there were at least one forum for each technology. My personal experience is they were as ruthless or more as Stack Overflow (website). To add to the pain, they had bad bad search tools, Google was not as good as it is now, and the worst thing is if you have problem in your Java code that involves interfacing with Oracle. You get kicked back and forth between Oracle and Java forums each claiming that this is probably a problem with the other technology. :)

So, stop whining, StackOverflow is probably the best thing happened to n00bs. It is okay to swallow your pride in order to learn something.

Some of the assumptions in this question are wrong. Every discussion forum evolves with time. With the passage of time so does the knowledge accumulated in it.

Reason behind downvotes and closing down the questions:
Stack Overflow for that matter has evolved to a stage where it feels like it's necessary to keep eliminating duplicates. Therefore when a problem which has been encountered earlier is seen, it's downvoted and closed.

Wrong assumptions while visiting the site:
The other mistake which beginners often commit is, they approach Stack Overflow to solve their assignments without having spen

Some of the assumptions in this question are wrong. Every discussion forum evolves with time. With the passage of time so does the knowledge accumulated in it.

Reason behind downvotes and closing down the questions:
Stack Overflow for that matter has evolved to a stage where it feels like it's necessary to keep eliminating duplicates. Therefore when a problem which has been encountered earlier is seen, it's downvoted and closed.

Wrong assumptions while visiting the site:
The other mistake which beginners often commit is, they approach Stack Overflow to solve their assignments without having spent enough time on them. This is not the place to get your work done at the cost of others' time. In the initial days it was tolerated. However it does not go well with its vision.

Expectations from users of the community by other users:
You need to prove to the community that you have put genuine effort by reading about the problem, trying alternatives and then post the specific question you have. Experts or those who have knowledge on those issues will be now able to guide you in the right direction.
Sometimes it may help you in getting the right solution right away, other times it will give you umpteen number of ideas.

Conclusion:
Once you register to Stack Overflow, you are supposed to read the beginners guide and adhere to the rules of the community.

I can very well guarantee you that despite all these restrictions which you find annoying, you will be supremely benefitted by the community.

There is a better way, but you just don't like it. All of the noob questions have been asked and answered 1000 times.. this is why they are so unwelcome. If there was a "safe" place for noob questions.. it would be full of noobs, and thus the blind leading the blind.

But, you are of great fortune... as all of those questions have been posed and answered; you just have to search for them using Google, or Bing or whatever suits your fancy.

However, stuff you get from simply reading the documentation, or actually writing a line of code, may not be there as this stuff just forms the assumption base

There is a better way, but you just don't like it. All of the noob questions have been asked and answered 1000 times.. this is why they are so unwelcome. If there was a "safe" place for noob questions.. it would be full of noobs, and thus the blind leading the blind.

But, you are of great fortune... as all of those questions have been posed and answered; you just have to search for them using Google, or Bing or whatever suits your fancy.

However, stuff you get from simply reading the documentation, or actually writing a line of code, may not be there as this stuff just forms the assumption base of the conversation… and thus goes unsaid. If this is what you are running into, then you need to find an instructor, and pay for their services… this is the exchange to get someone who knows what they are doing to bring you along. And, because they are getting paid, they are friendly or they don't have any students quickly.

Once you get up to some level of proficiency, you will find even more of your questions already asked and answered. This is a great boon as asking and waiting for an answer sucks.

At the last level, you get to the novel situations, and the problems that other folks are confronting and working around… this is what is generally the fare of Stack Overflow. But, plenty of noobs there just the same… hence the rude. But, this is much better than the old IRC space used for the same as those guys would hack your machine for bothering them.

Good luck!

I know exactly how you feel. Getting help is frustrating when you don't know the 'right' way to ask and don't have the background knowledge to even understand the highly technical responses you might see on StackOverflow. I actually had to set up comment threads / forums for my students learning on BaseRails because StackOverflow was too inaccessible for some of the newer students.

Unfortunately though, there isn't a noob-friendly alternative. Your best bet is to become really good at using Google to find what you need. There are a ton of blog posts, articles, and forum comments that will have

I know exactly how you feel. Getting help is frustrating when you don't know the 'right' way to ask and don't have the background knowledge to even understand the highly technical responses you might see on StackOverflow. I actually had to set up comment threads / forums for my students learning on BaseRails because StackOverflow was too inaccessible for some of the newer students.

Unfortunately though, there isn't a noob-friendly alternative. Your best bet is to become really good at using Google to find what you need. There are a ton of blog posts, articles, and forum comments that will have much more beginner-friendly answers.

I don't think that one is needed. As a noob, I feel right at home on stack overflow. Like others have said, make sure to at least search what your question is before making one that might be a duplicate. Most "stupid" questions have probably already been answered on stack overflow or somewhere else and, unless on some obscure topic, found with relative ease.

Why do you even bother to try something else? It’s the best.

But if not then: without out a doubt a good slack group is the best alternative, after that maybe a meetup group, then Quora/reddit if it’s not code-heavy and rather is conceptual.

CodeChef Discuss

Or you can also ask programming questions at Quora too.

See Is there a site like Stack Exchange, but for newbies?

Stack Overflow is for all people you just need to find appropriate question and their answer otherwise depends on type of question.

If you need hand-holding, Experts Exchange is still up and running