Should I order a static IP from an ISP versus a dynamic IP? What are the pros or cons?

So, I have had static IP addresses for myself since about 2002. I started with business class IDSL, moved up to T1, then moved into town where I got business class cable service.

The pros are that I’ve been able to run servers and VPNs (peer to peer and inbound, not just going out to the Internet) on my home network. I don’t have to mess around with renting more computers from Digital Ocean, AWS or Azure. I run torrents, email, web (sometimes), and SSH.

Another pro from business class service is no port blocking and no traffic use limits. I’m currently averaging over two terabytes per month on C

So, I have had static IP addresses for myself since about 2002. I started with business class IDSL, moved up to T1, then moved into town where I got business class cable service.

The pros are that I’ve been able to run servers and VPNs (peer to peer and inbound, not just going out to the Internet) on my home network. I don’t have to mess around with renting more computers from Digital Ocean, AWS or Azure. I run torrents, email, web (sometimes), and SSH.

Another pro from business class service is no port blocking and no traffic use limits. I’m currently averaging over two terabytes per month on Comcast and they don’t bother me about it.

Cons are the price. Business class is generally required to get a static IP and they charge more for it. Probably double. Then on top of that they add a fee for the static IP. Back in 2002 that fee was $5/mo. It is now up to $25/mo. As the strain on IPv4 continues to increase I predict the cost will too. At some point I might have to drop IPv4 static IP and use only IPv6.

Another con is that because it is business class and because there’s no port blocking, the user is responsible for their own security. If you run a web server and don’t know what you’re doing with it, it will get hacked and it will be entirely your problem.

Anyone who would ask this question almost certainly does not need a static IP and it would be silly to pay the extra cost to get one. A static IP has value when you are running a server that needs to always be accessible via an IP address that will not change. For your own web browsing activities, it does not matter if your IP changes occasionally. (The most likely thing that would cause it to change is a reboot of your internet modem.)

Really simple: are you planning to host anything that computers from the outside will need to be able to access, like a web server, a mail server, or a VPN server? If so, MAYBE you should consider a static address. If not, you should not even consider it.