Is it really true that intelligent people talk less? And on the other hand, is it true that people who talk more are not smart?

I don't think it is possible to make such a generalization. Talkativeness is associated with extroversion rather than intelligence. Besides, there are many different kinds of intelligence, so we would have to specify what kind of intelligence we are talking about. I assume you are talking about the sort of intelligence that can be measured on standard IQ tests, the sort of intelligence that involves logical reasoning and so on.

Using this definition of intelligence, we might say that "intelligent" people who are extroverted are likely to talk quite a lot because that is part of their personalit

I don't think it is possible to make such a generalization. Talkativeness is associated with extroversion rather than intelligence. Besides, there are many different kinds of intelligence, so we would have to specify what kind of intelligence we are talking about. I assume you are talking about the sort of intelligence that can be measured on standard IQ tests, the sort of intelligence that involves logical reasoning and so on.

Using this definition of intelligence, we might say that "intelligent" people who are extroverted are likely to talk quite a lot because that is part of their personality. "Intelligent" people who are introverted are likely to talk less because of their introversion.

However, it must be said generally that "intelligent" people enjoy spending time thinking about things, discovering things for themselves, and expanding their knowledge. So, naturally, if they are doing a lot of thinking, they are quite likely to do less talking. I would say that "intelligent" people are comfortable with silence because it gives them an opportunity to think and reflect. People who do not think for themselves are likely to talk a lot to fill the emptiness in their minds. They tend to feel uncomfortable with (and threatened by) silence because their silence is empty, whereas for people who like to think, silence is filled with reflective thoughts and is, therefore, not uncomfortable or threatening.

These are, of course, generalizations. It is important to keep that in mind.

I agree with the other answers about the perils of generalising. I'll add some different points.

1. The person with the highest measured IQ is currently one of my countrymen, an Australian. He is quick to say however that his score reflects the fact that he is good at doing IQ tests. So he's really saying that this is a specific skill, which doesn't make him some all-knowing god-like entity. He is clearly a bright chap and I'd be interested to hear his thoughts on a variety of topics, especially given that IQ testing tends to favour people who can see the big picture and the big patterns.

2.

I agree with the other answers about the perils of generalising. I'll add some different points.

1. The person with the highest measured IQ is currently one of my countrymen, an Australian. He is quick to say however that his score reflects the fact that he is good at doing IQ tests. So he's really saying that this is a specific skill, which doesn't make him some all-knowing god-like entity. He is clearly a bright chap and I'd be interested to hear his thoughts on a variety of topics, especially given that IQ testing tends to favour people who can see the big picture and the big patterns.

2. There is a Bertrand Russell quote that I love which might be relevant here:

"The whole problem with the world is that the fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."

3. Some people seem to like the sound of their own voice. They might be good at talking, but actually have little to say :-)

The answer to both of your questions is no. Being intelligent or smart has little or nothing to do with how much someone talks.

Hopefully, if we are sincere in all our endeavors we will attain enough wisdom to know that listening is usually more important than talking. We will think before speaking and choose our words wisely so that our intentions and meaning will be clear.

I have known very intelligent people who could talk circles around me and bury me in logical arguments for which I had no taste and that were a tremendous waste of air. I no longer feel the need to be right nor talk myself i

The answer to both of your questions is no. Being intelligent or smart has little or nothing to do with how much someone talks.

Hopefully, if we are sincere in all our endeavors we will attain enough wisdom to know that listening is usually more important than talking. We will think before speaking and choose our words wisely so that our intentions and meaning will be clear.

I have known very intelligent people who could talk circles around me and bury me in logical arguments for which I had no taste and that were a tremendous waste of air. I no longer feel the need to be right nor talk myself into a fit over things that don't really matter much anyway.

I have come to have little regard for perceived intelligence or lack thereof. I admire and respect a person of few words who, when they speak, are honest, forthcoming, helpful, and kind with their well-chosen words. I have said too much already-- the temptation is always there!

(Thanks for A2A)

Empty vessels make more sound.

Though we shouldn't generalise,for one fact,I know intelligent people,whether extrovert and introvert,keep themselves occupied.
Intelligent people keep themselves busy,reflecting,thinking, reading,tinkering with things or being on the internet and understanding how things work that they are unlikely to come across as talkative.

However, Intelligent extroverts do ask intelligent questions,but even then their interaction is limited with the like-minded.They observe more but also freely share their ideas.
A predisposition towards silence and introversion is definitel

Empty vessels make more sound.

Though we shouldn't generalise,for one fact,I know intelligent people,whether extrovert and introvert,keep themselves occupied.
Intelligent people keep themselves busy,reflecting,thinking, reading,tinkering with things or being on the internet and understanding how things work that they are unlikely to come across as talkative.

However, Intelligent extroverts do ask intelligent questions,but even then their interaction is limited with the like-minded.They observe more but also freely share their ideas.
A predisposition towards silence and introversion is definitely noticed.

No correlation between intelligence and shyness has ever been confirmed (and, in fact, in school settings shy children are often seen as unintelligent) but the generalisation that intelligent people are quiet persists.

Let's look at why this generalisation exists - I believe there are three seemingly contradictory roots:

1) Social awkwardness / inflexibility

The most pervasive misconception about intelligent people is probably that they do not want to communicate with "average" people. As someone who falls within the 0.01% percentile of IQ scores, I feel I can speak for the group we tend to

No correlation between intelligence and shyness has ever been confirmed (and, in fact, in school settings shy children are often seen as unintelligent) but the generalisation that intelligent people are quiet persists.

Let's look at why this generalisation exists - I believe there are three seemingly contradictory roots:

1) Social awkwardness / inflexibility

The most pervasive misconception about intelligent people is probably that they do not want to communicate with "average" people. As someone who falls within the 0.01% percentile of IQ scores, I feel I can speak for the group we tend to think of as "intelligent people" when I say that I have never met someone that I could genuinely say was average or uninteresting. As I work and socialise with more people I only become more aware of how narrow a definition of intelligence we often have - and how harmful it can be to both "intelligent" and "average" people.

- One negative outcome of our narrow definition of intelligence is that many people who have been labelled intelligent since childhood struggle with social flexibility, because the idea that they are different to their peers has been reinforced so throughly in both school and personal settings. These people often fall into a pattern of being withdrawn, because they feel they do not know how to respond to social situations.

- People who score highly on tests (IQ and otherwise) early in life often struggle with low self-esteem later on. From my own experience, I can confirm that the pressure of being "the smart one" has lasting influence on how you feel about your achievements and abilities, because they can never measure up to what you feel is expected of you. Low self-esteem very easily triggers social anxiety, and therefore, a more quiet and withdrawn personality.

2) Sensitivity

- True intelligence incorporates emotional intelligence and empathy, and genuinely intelligent people tend to be insightful about how other people are affected by their words and actions

- Sensitivity is often associated with a less assertive, more shy, self-critical, personality

- Therefore intelligence is often associated with the shyness that comes with increased sensitivity.

3) "Intelligent" people often prefer to incubate their ideas

As a final point I'd like to draw attention to the fact that certain people are external processors while others are internal processors. Most of the traditionally intelligent people I have met are internal processors, whether because of social factors or inherent nature.

- External processors problem-solve better when they are actually talking through their ideas. Logically, this often means that one hears their "draft" ideas rather than their polished ideas.

- Internal processors prefer to incubate ideas within their own minds and make sure they are somewhat confident in what they want to say before they say it. So their ideas come across as more polished.

TL;DR: "Intelligent" people are not necessarily shy, aloof, or taciturn. What they often are is self-critical and sensitive. People process and express ideas differently, which means they air their ideas at different stages of "readiness" and may seem more or less intelligent.

I recently learned about the Dunning Kruger effect, which they call the scientific proof for why less-knowledgeable people tend to be more self-confident than knowledgeable people. Check out the wiki: Dunning–Kruger effect

I like their term "illusory superiority".

I agree that a generalization on intellect level cannot be gleaned from a persons introverted/extroverted personality type. A more suitable form determination for this type of trait would be better assessed using MBTI or other psychological evaluative tests.

As others have stated, the pendulum swings both ways. Some smart people are very talkative, some "dumb" people are fairly introverted. My personal experience has been that very high intellect individuals tend to speak less for a couple of reasons (by "intellect" I'm referring to IQ, and by "high" I'm referring to a score of 120ish+ On

I agree that a generalization on intellect level cannot be gleaned from a persons introverted/extroverted personality type. A more suitable form determination for this type of trait would be better assessed using MBTI or other psychological evaluative tests.

As others have stated, the pendulum swings both ways. Some smart people are very talkative, some "dumb" people are fairly introverted. My personal experience has been that very high intellect individuals tend to speak less for a couple of reasons (by "intellect" I'm referring to IQ, and by "high" I'm referring to a score of 120ish+ On a standardized intelligence test, or ~ two SD's from the mean):

1) They posses a larger vocabulary which allows them to be more concise in the points they are trying to make.

2) They posses a larger amount of general knowledge which allows them "connect the dots" quicker and form more concise arguments.

3) They posses extremely deep subject matter expertise and feel the need for long-winded explanations is unnecessary (think of having a conversation with Mark Zuckerberg on programming).

All that being said, you would be unable to look across a room and see someone sitting in silence and expect them to be a genius, and reverse for someone speaking a lot and assuming they are "dumb" (however if you could hear the actual words used and/or the conversation you would be able to make a more accurate assessment).

People with strong intelligence actually tend to ramble on quite a bit. Once they begin to exert an idea, they seek numerous ways to break it down within the English language into an exact meaning of what it is they are saying. Often times, this creates massive strings of miscommunication between them and the listener, because the listener is too busy trying to absorb what the speaker has just said, and to grapple the often chaotic mindset that a genius speaks in.

Some geniuses actually need apprentices who stay with them to break down their ideas into laymans terms. Some examples are Freud wit

People with strong intelligence actually tend to ramble on quite a bit. Once they begin to exert an idea, they seek numerous ways to break it down within the English language into an exact meaning of what it is they are saying. Often times, this creates massive strings of miscommunication between them and the listener, because the listener is too busy trying to absorb what the speaker has just said, and to grapple the often chaotic mindset that a genius speaks in.

Some geniuses actually need apprentices who stay with them to break down their ideas into laymans terms. Some examples are Freud with Jung, and Nikola Tesla with Thomas Edison. Many mathematician geniuses do not need apprentices and are able to juxtapose their ideas into a string of formula or an equation which can sum up the variables of what they think, hence the value of the language of math.

It is the geniuses in other fields such as philosophy, psychology, biology, engineering and other sciences who require an apprentice who stays with them daily and records notes so as to simplify them later on.

Once a genius in these fields begins to exhibit ideas, their theories begin to trickle out of their mouthes in an ever-quickening waterfall, much to the dismay of those listening. They are often labeled “verbose” and “eccentric” because of this habit. Sometimes, an apprentice can formulate ideas based off of the theories which can be better applied into daily life, as was the case with both Jung and Edison. Often however, upon doing this, they are criticized heavily by the genius master, who believes that they laid the ground work for such profiteering (whether social, financial, or otherwise) and henceforth deserve most of the credit.

Not necessarily. I spend way more time alone so there is plenty of time in the middle of the night for thinking, yet I am talkative when with close friends to the point of being a chatterbox some days, I guess to make up for lost time!
But they are, too. We take turns.

I need to add that this is only with those I am comfortable with or have 'hit it off' to where we feel as if we are old friends.
In a crowd, maybe, maybe not.

I was shy but have learned not to be.
Mostly.
Only child, shy, few playmates, all older.

High IQ, but told I was too smart for my own good.
Was not allowed to skip grades a

Not necessarily. I spend way more time alone so there is plenty of time in the middle of the night for thinking, yet I am talkative when with close friends to the point of being a chatterbox some days, I guess to make up for lost time!
But they are, too. We take turns.

I need to add that this is only with those I am comfortable with or have 'hit it off' to where we feel as if we are old friends.
In a crowd, maybe, maybe not.

I was shy but have learned not to be.
Mostly.
Only child, shy, few playmates, all older.

High IQ, but told I was too smart for my own good.
Was not allowed to skip grades as the school recommended.
My best friend did. I was alone, bored and was used like a second teacher in my classes.

I had an independent mom but extremely critical father. Mixed message:
" You can be/do anything you want to be/do."
"But it's wrong or silly ie. music/art are a waste of time."

Empathetic, "too sensitive." "Knew too much."

Had to get out of school & go away, have a bad marriage, & get out after 20 years before I felt human.
Never bored now!
It's so nice to be free!

Intelligent folk prattle ignorantly less than the dimwitted, who can hardly help but testify to their condition when speaking.

Nevertheless, intelligence has little to do with how loquacious someone might be. Some are chattier than others, whether they have much to say notwithstanding.

In any case, there's a fair likelihood that if one is bright, one will better know which thousand words to use in describing a given topic, where one is without a picture worth looking at.

I think it varies. The very intelligent people often will talk more or talk less depending on where they are. If, at let's say a board meeting at the office, the more intelligent executives will say more because smart input is what is expected. The office member sitting there not speaking may look to the other executives as a useless bump on a log who’s putting no contribution towards the company. However, in a line at a public place or something (grocery store, movie theater, etc.), the intelligent people will often not speak to anyone around them unless they absolutely have to. Not a complet

I think it varies. The very intelligent people often will talk more or talk less depending on where they are. If, at let's say a board meeting at the office, the more intelligent executives will say more because smart input is what is expected. The office member sitting there not speaking may look to the other executives as a useless bump on a log who’s putting no contribution towards the company. However, in a line at a public place or something (grocery store, movie theater, etc.), the intelligent people will often not speak to anyone around them unless they absolutely have to. Not a completely accurate generalization but often in public places it seems the working class types are chattier with strangers than upper/middle or upper classes. A possibility being that smarter people often feel the need to think before speaking more than the less smart. A possibility is that the higher classes think more before talking where the not as high class people talk more just to talk. This is not a totally accurate generalization though. One thing that of course has fueled this generalization that upper/middle and upper classes are smarter than working classes is their higher levels of education. The thing is though, that there are different kinds of smart, book smart and common sense smart. A college PHD grad can be super intelligent book smart but not have alot of common street smarts. A factory worker with no education beyond high school can be the complete reverse. Also, a PHD grad can be a near genius in their field of study but ignorant in a field they did not go to college for, such as for example, a chemical engineer PHD grad will be brilliant in that field but may not know the first thing about law practice and the bar exam.

Anyways, as to say whether people who talk more are smarter than quieter people is difficult to get a concrete answer on. Someone very dumb could either be a nonstop blabber mouth idiot who keeps spewing out a load of nonsense or they could be a quiet “duh duh” idiot who doesn't talk because they are completely out of it and their head’s no smarter than a couple of bricks. It often, I guess, has more to do with what is being said rather than how much one is speaking. Not everyone's opinion is going to be the same either on which people are smart or not. Take me, you can read what I'm writing here and either find what I'm saying is really insightful, or you can think that I just don't know what I am talking about. Not everyone thinks the same. On anything.