I'm bad at math because I can't think logically. What should I do?

From the question you are asking I assume you are still in school. This question can be answered in many ways. This is my suggestion.
First of all, I would seek help in learning math in the way I think. There are qualified teachers that do that, I’m sure. Visual tools help a lot to create picture in your mind and it works for the rest of person’s life.
You have to learn math, because it is involved in anything you want to do. You don’t have to go to higher math if it is not for you. But to be a carpenter, mechanic, hairdresser, sewing, cooking, farmer, forest ranger, craftsman, etc., no matte

From the question you are asking I assume you are still in school. This question can be answered in many ways. This is my suggestion.
First of all, I would seek help in learning math in the way I think. There are qualified teachers that do that, I’m sure. Visual tools help a lot to create picture in your mind and it works for the rest of person’s life.
You have to learn math, because it is involved in anything you want to do. You don’t have to go to higher math if it is not for you. But to be a carpenter, mechanic, hairdresser, sewing, cooking, farmer, forest ranger, craftsman, etc., no matter what, you will needs math of some level.
As you put the effort to do the above, ask yourself what you enjoy doing? Pursue that with great effort and joy. Laziness has to come out of your vocabulary and character, because no matter, male or female, you have to be ready to provide for the necessities of a family later on, or for yourself. Doing what you enjoy as a job it will make your life pleasant and joyful. Do not be intimidated by social pressure. That makes many unhappy people pursuing big money, prestige, and fame.
We humans are selfish beings. We want to do what gives us pleasure. The good part of this selfishness helps us find our gifts and talents instilled in us from birth. Developing them to full potential is up to us for our own good and for the good of all the others. Trampling on others to achieve that is totally wrong and there is no joy in it.
Talk to your teachers and seek advice how can they help you achieve your dream. They help the students that think about their future and are focused.

Good luck

If you can't think logically, then that can be solved by learning sentential and predicate logic. My favorite book for beginners is, “The Logic Book” by Bergmann, Nelson, and Moor. Focus on the 2 chapters that deals with derivations. Not only will learning formal logic help you understand mathematical arguments, but also general arguments as well. After learning how to think logically you might ask yourself the following two questions: 1. How much college level math do I need for my career(if any). And 2, what's the best approach to learn the required college math needed. Here is some economic

If you can't think logically, then that can be solved by learning sentential and predicate logic. My favorite book for beginners is, “The Logic Book” by Bergmann, Nelson, and Moor. Focus on the 2 chapters that deals with derivations. Not only will learning formal logic help you understand mathematical arguments, but also general arguments as well. After learning how to think logically you might ask yourself the following two questions: 1. How much college level math do I need for my career(if any). And 2, what's the best approach to learn the required college math needed. Here is some economical advice from experience. Many schools will tell you to buy the latest edition of a math textbook. But in reality, you could save hundreds of dollars by buying a previous edition since math textbooks are 99% identical to its previous editions. Cheers

Do what I have done all my life. Avoid math like the plague. I took required courses in college that had math in them, and with help managed to pass these courses and meet the school’s requirements. Other than that I stayed away from math. Oddly enough I enjoyed math, I just didn’t not understand it very well. All the best to you. Thank you.

Interestingly, I have just finished having coffee with a long-time friend (we’ve been mates since we did undergrad, honours, Masters and PhD together… neither of us finished our PhD’s) and we were discussing exactly this.

The context was things as simple as

  • the Monty Hall ‘paradox’ (not a paradox - it’s just Bayes Theorem);
  • the Ellsberg ‘paradox’ (not a paradox… just conditional probability again); and
  • all the garbage promulgated by the small-N, near-zero-cost-vs-near-zero-benefit ‘studies’ that have been touted by arbitrageurs from psychobabble to ‘behavioural’ economics.

(Most of those “gotcha!”

Interestingly, I have just finished having coffee with a long-time friend (we’ve been mates since we did undergrad, honours, Masters and PhD together… neither of us finished our PhD’s) and we were discussing exactly this.

The context was things as simple as

  • the Monty Hall ‘paradox’ (not a paradox - it’s just Bayes Theorem);
  • the Ellsberg ‘paradox’ (not a paradox… just conditional probability again); and
  • all the garbage promulgated by the small-N, near-zero-cost-vs-near-zero-benefit ‘studies’ that have been touted by arbitrageurs from psychobabble to ‘behavioural’ economics.

(Most of those “gotcha!” claims - e.g., Ariely claiming to have refuted “rationality” based on 15 white grad students revealing they didn’t give a shit about his silly experiment - are levied against a straw-man, first year undergraduate pedagogic model that nobody thinks represents reality, and are based on “trick questions” where the payoff is near-zero… and therefore the amount of cognitive effort rationally dedicated to the problem is near-zero.)

Anyhow… my mate is a slightly more charitable soul than I am, and thinks that the problem is that so much of non-trivial mathematics is counter-intuitive - and that logic in particular is quite hard, even when the payoff to correct decisions is significant. He was until recently at BlackRock, so he’s not a bleeding heart by any stretch.

However I’m a “τασυκασυκα,τμνσκαϕηνδηνσκαϕηνονομασωντασυκασυκα,τμνσκαϕηνδηνσκαϕηνονομασων” guy (“call figs figs, and a tub a tub”), so I tend to attribute mathematical ignorance to a general lack of cognitive ‘grunt’, paired with a generally poor level of pedagogy.

The general lack of cognitive grunt is explained by the fact that we in the West have subsidised reproduction of the bottom 2 quartiles. The subsidy for reproduction is of sufficient value to tilt reproductive choices only in the bottom half of the income/IQ dfistribution (they’re not the same, but they overlap).

Smart women have better things to do that be pregnant half their adult lives, so they subsidy does not affect their decisions very much.

That’s why we now see behaviours in the bottom quartile (by income) that used only to be seen in the bottom decile.

The cognitive bifurcation we see - a smaller cohort of smart people reproducing at below replacement, versus a gigantic horde of dummies breeding like rabbits - is no longer offset by

  • high levels of infant mortality in the bottom quartile (let me stipulate that reduced infant mortality is unambiguously a good thing);
  • large-scale wars that disproportionately kill young dumb males;
  • epidemics.

So the dumb are subsidised to spurt out offspring, and they almost all live to adulthood. Rinse and repeat.

You get more of what you subsidise, and we subsidise “stupid reproduction”.

As to pedagogy, I’ve said this before:

Part of the problem with mathematics education is that the first exposure students get to it these days it filtered through an individual who was a serial underperformer.

“A lack of economic alternatives” is the only reason why anyone able to enter a university would ever become a high school teacher. This has been true since the 1990s; there are exceptions, but fewer exceptions as time passes.

There are a couple of factors that must coincide in order for a graduate to become a high school teacher.

They must be on the receiving end of a degree with no labour-market value - either because of the discipline itself, or because of performance - and you also be incapable of getting a job in a bureaucracy (also a low bar, but better-paid and easier than teaching).

That’s the right mental frame to have when considering the people teaching year 9 maths.

So the assembled class is unlikely to get a coherent answer when they ask the time-honoured question that we all heard during high school maths (always from a student at a priori risk of failing the subject)

“Sir, when are we ever going to use this in real life?”

At some point, everybody hits a sort of road block in regardless in what way. Sometimes it is one part of an exercise you can't solve, sometimes it is a detail in a topic or the topic itself that seems very difficult to approach and understand.

There are a few general ways to get around these road blocks or st some point overrun them completely:

  1. If you don't have a deadline e.g. your homework is due, leave yourself A LOT of time to pause. The worst thing you can do, is trying to actively find a solution for hours or even having to do late-night studying. Use techniques like pomodoro to manage yo

At some point, everybody hits a sort of road block in regardless in what way. Sometimes it is one part of an exercise you can't solve, sometimes it is a detail in a topic or the topic itself that seems very difficult to approach and understand.

There are a few general ways to get around these road blocks or st some point overrun them completely:

  1. If you don't have a deadline e.g. your homework is due, leave yourself A LOT of time to pause. The worst thing you can do, is trying to actively find a solution for hours or even having to do late-night studying. Use techniques like pomodoro to manage your time to actively study and taking pauses.
  2. If you have a deadline, use the same technique mentioned in step 1 or any other one that fits you. You can work a little longer, but you should not sacrifice your sleep for it.
  3. When you do pauses, set a timer for as long as you need it (for reference, I do 15-20min pauses) and completely distract yourself. Eat something, play a game, watch your favorite YouTubers whatever.
  4. When you return to study, then STUDY. No distractions!
  5. If you are stuck on an exercise, mark it, and continue with the other ones, until you can come back to the exercise, you were stuck on. Sometimes, it is the perfect time to pause and then to continue again.
  6. Ask anyone around you for help (classmates, or, if possible, the teacher)
  7. The best tip here: communicate to others what you have understood. Tell them the way you would have solved this exercise or explain a math topic you learned previously and others can give their view. Then find out, what was common and what was different.

Now, there are also concrete tips when solving exercises:

  1. Find out, what the exercise wants to know from you and find topics accordingly in your textbook or in your notes for information.
  2. Read slowly and mark important numbers or, in a word problem, what is asked from you to solve it.
  3. Make easier examples of that exercise you can solve and relate it to the exercise

And don't hesitate to look for maths resources where it is most comfortable for you to reach: No doubt, YouTube is a great opportunity to look and learn math topics quickly. Just see what you need and watch the video, then apply it to the exercise.

Learning comes with time and hard work and failure is built with it. You should recognize and accept that. That is all I can say here, hope that helps you out 🙂

A2A. I find it hard to believe that so many can subscribe to the notion that the act of practicing will make you better without any mention of knowing what you’re doing.

I can pick up a violin and practice making sounds. It doesn’t mean I am playing music. In another case, I can pick up a violin and rehearse from memory what my instructor taught me and I may develop motor skills for playing, develop my ear, and certainly get better at playing that particular piece. There is no question to how limited that is and how terrible progression would be over time.

Many students don’t even know what a hy

A2A. I find it hard to believe that so many can subscribe to the notion that the act of practicing will make you better without any mention of knowing what you’re doing.

I can pick up a violin and practice making sounds. It doesn’t mean I am playing music. In another case, I can pick up a violin and rehearse from memory what my instructor taught me and I may develop motor skills for playing, develop my ear, and certainly get better at playing that particular piece. There is no question to how limited that is and how terrible progression would be over time.

Many students don’t even know what a hypothetical statement is or really even grasp the concept of a well-formed mathematical statement. You will always be limited in your capicity if you can not understand what you’re reading in mathematics. Moving symbols around from your hours of practice and getting a result that agrees with the answer key is not mathematics and it is not a gauge of understanding.

Mathematics is unique as an academic discipline because the purpose of its structure is to reduce ambiguity. The semantics and syntax of mathematical language make it possible to express relationships in a way that colloquial languages are unable to grasp. Therefore, a true understanding of mathematics requires that an individual must possess strong reasoning faculties and knowledge of the underpinnings of mathematical language (logic, set theory, etc…).

We see a distinct divide between those who are good at mathmatics and those who are not. However, it is not the ability or lack of ability that should be scrutinized. If you consider this from the perspective of how the information is being delivered, it becomes more clear that it is the ability to memorize and repeat processes that creates the divide rather than mathematical ability.

If a student is capable of writing clearly and expressing ideas creatively, they have mathematical ability. If a student is capable of reading and alalyzing literature, they have mathematical ability. If a student is good at taking an abstraction in their mind and creating it on a canvas, they have mathematical ability. If a student is good at reading music and translating that into meaningful sound, they have mathematical ability.

For everything else we learn we are given a context and a framework, except for what we learn in mathematics. There is no sound to hear in math as in music, or kinesthetic pattern to teach the nervous system as in sport, or immersion and constant usage as in one’s native language. The foundation and the context of math is logic, which underpins the syntax and semantics of mathematical language. One can not be expected to learn anything when the material is presented without the prerequisite ability to interpret it.

Of course, practice is important. But, not any practice. Study logic, set theory, and how to represent relationships in mathematical notation. This gives you a foundation to think critically and reason from. Otherwise you build this foundation (if at all) by slowly filling it in from arbitrary practice, which will always leave holes.

Have you had an assessment for learning disabilities : I write as a father who has a son with severe learning disabilities so I am sincere in wishing to help you!

I live in the U.K. and it is possible that we do things differently here but if someone falls 1.5 to 2 key stages (1.5 to 2years) behind their age group in the U.K. they are screened by an Educational Psychologist to determine how their educational needs can best be met.

My son was found to have reached his academic potential at 15 owing to a condition known as arrested development which meant that there was no point in him struggling

Have you had an assessment for learning disabilities : I write as a father who has a son with severe learning disabilities so I am sincere in wishing to help you!

I live in the U.K. and it is possible that we do things differently here but if someone falls 1.5 to 2 key stages (1.5 to 2years) behind their age group in the U.K. they are screened by an Educational Psychologist to determine how their educational needs can best be met.

My son was found to have reached his academic potential at 15 owing to a condition known as arrested development which meant that there was no point in him struggling to make further academic progress (it would only have worsened his self image) he was transferred to a college course where he was taught life skills and it made him; his teachers and us as his parents much happier knowing that we had not failed him and he had not failed us!

If you have arrested development and have reached your academic potential there is no point in struggling to learn concepts which are too advanced for your mental age : alternatively you may find that you have a specific learning disability called dyscalculia (which is a problem with numbers) in which case there are learning strategies to help you cope.

So my advice to you is to speak to your counsellor and ask if you can be screened by an Educational Psychologist you need to have your educational problem(s) assessed if you want help with them.

Yes, they are two different areas of the brain. I would say that math and logic are complementary opposites.

Simply put, Math quantifies while Logic clarifies.

Math provides accurate numericle results, but little intuitive understanding of cause and effect.

Logic provides a greater understanding of cause and effect, but usually only first order estimates of quantitative results.

Math is only useful for matters dealing with numbers, logic is useful for all matters and is basically the creative thought process.

Logic is prone to errors due to intuitive false premise, while math is prone to errors of

Yes, they are two different areas of the brain. I would say that math and logic are complementary opposites.

Simply put, Math quantifies while Logic clarifies.

Math provides accurate numericle results, but little intuitive understanding of cause and effect.

Logic provides a greater understanding of cause and effect, but usually only first order estimates of quantitative results.

Math is only useful for matters dealing with numbers, logic is useful for all matters and is basically the creative thought process.

Logic is prone to errors due to intuitive false premise, while math is prone to errors of intuitive false conclusions.

Mathematical formalism is a rigorous step by step process that can only progress forwards.

Logic includes deduction (forward) and induction (backwards) process. Therefore it can solve problems in hindsite such as criminal investigations or trouble shooting problems. It can also solve hidden domains such as reverse engineering an Integrated Circuit.

Math is accumulative where methods can be further developed into more advanced methods and often requires a list of prerequisites, making it more suitable to learn through education and less suitable for learning in a piecmeal fashion. e.g. arithmatic, algebra, calculous, differential equations,…

Logic is less connected to academics and more connected to experience. Since it’s a creative proces and dependant on a wider base of circumstances it must be more flexible. It answers more than how much or how long, but it answers any question, such as why or how it does what it does.

The more math that you need to apply to solve a problem, the more complex the solution will become.

The more logic that you apply towards solving a problem, the more simple the solution will become.

Many problems can be solved by both logic and math. quite often logic may create a shortcut to a very difficult mathematical problem.

example:

Assuming all records are available, what is the average win rate for all poker players that play at a certain stakes in a certain card club when excluding any rake or time charge.

A mathematician will probably not even attempt such a difficult problem even with all available records citing problems with variance and sample size

A logician will tell you it’s 0, any money lost is also money won.

Being keen to improve is a brilliant attitude. Be assured, if you’re prepared to put in time and effort on your math you will improve. Ask your math teacher to help you set achievable goals and learn strategies for reaching them. The Internet also has great tutorials on all aspects of math. Use Google!

Above all - don’t compare your achievements with others. There will always be people who seem better than you at anything. That’s life. Your goal is not to get better than them - it’s to keep improving on where you currently are. As a retired teacher I can say I’ve always been far more impressed

Being keen to improve is a brilliant attitude. Be assured, if you’re prepared to put in time and effort on your math you will improve. Ask your math teacher to help you set achievable goals and learn strategies for reaching them. The Internet also has great tutorials on all aspects of math. Use Google!

Above all - don’t compare your achievements with others. There will always be people who seem better than you at anything. That’s life. Your goal is not to get better than them - it’s to keep improving on where you currently are. As a retired teacher I can say I’ve always been far more impressed with students who work hard and turn a D into a C than those who coast along on Bs and can’t be bothered to put in the effort to get an A. Its the people who aren’t afraid of hard work who end up achieving success and satisfaction in their lives, regardless of the grades they got at school.

I guarantee you that comparing your grades with others isn’t important. Constantly improving on where you are, is. The things that will work best for you throughout life are self motivation and persistence. The rewards from these will amaze you! Keep it up. :-)

Separate in your mind arithmetic from mathematics and ensure the basic arithmetic is competent, including tables and simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. It is this calculating you will mostly need in life. Expand it to include both decimals and fractions - all this is an area of mechanical calculation with little theory needed

Beyond this you will need a tutor, or a helpful one on one teacher to get you to the level demanded of exams that lead to entry into the further education that will train you in the direction of your chosen occupation. The amount of mathematics you

Separate in your mind arithmetic from mathematics and ensure the basic arithmetic is competent, including tables and simple addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. It is this calculating you will mostly need in life. Expand it to include both decimals and fractions - all this is an area of mechanical calculation with little theory needed

Beyond this you will need a tutor, or a helpful one on one teacher to get you to the level demanded of exams that lead to entry into the further education that will train you in the direction of your chosen occupation. The amount of mathematics you need may be far less than you fear

In my personal experience the text book that our teacher demanded we use was absolutely awful. You may need an alternative text book, and computer program-based help

One problem I had was that maths teachers delude themselves that their subject is universally fascinating. For me it wasn’t, but I found that out too late at a time when maths was over-promoted for serving the needs of life - and that made me feel inadequate, which made the subject even worse

Years later - as with Latin, a subject I detested - I felt I would like to correct my lack of understanding. But the need had never been there for either, I needed Calculus as much as I needed to be able to translate into Latin “the Gauls are attacking the ramparts and ditches”. It may be so for you too

Hi, how are you ?

My bro, don't get feel as you told that you are smart but you can't study math.

Every learning material requires focus and hard work along with otther thinga. As hard is the key towards succes. Being smart isn't enough, you should also be hard working.

Smart means that you are talented. But here you should also ponder “ Hard work beats talent”.

So finally the problem basically you are facing is that you are not working hard. You have made up mind that you are smart enough and you can do even math easily, but the end result is zero.

To achieve any thing in life following points are

Hi, how are you ?

My bro, don't get feel as you told that you are smart but you can't study math.

Every learning material requires focus and hard work along with otther thinga. As hard is the key towards succes. Being smart isn't enough, you should also be hard working.

Smart means that you are talented. But here you should also ponder “ Hard work beats talent”.

So finally the problem basically you are facing is that you are not working hard. You have made up mind that you are smart enough and you can do even math easily, but the end result is zero.

To achieve any thing in life following points are the steps.

Hard work.

Persistence

Focus on your goal.

Be encourage.

Have a good day.

I’m not sure what your background is (are you talking about high school, or college level mathematics) but what I will say is you really need to start well from your basics. High school arithmetic, algebra and geometry. A lot of people struggle with these early on a lag behind later in their studies because these are foundational skills. You should be able to do stuff like simplify fractions, convert to decimals, solve linear equations etc.

Once you get used to the conventions and why they work, you will enjoy maths better.

I used to share this site with students in high school trying to learn m

I’m not sure what your background is (are you talking about high school, or college level mathematics) but what I will say is you really need to start well from your basics. High school arithmetic, algebra and geometry. A lot of people struggle with these early on a lag behind later in their studies because these are foundational skills. You should be able to do stuff like simplify fractions, convert to decimals, solve linear equations etc.

Once you get used to the conventions and why they work, you will enjoy maths better.

I used to share this site with students in high school trying to learn mathematics

Algebra Index

Algebra 2

Trigonometry Index

After that comes Calculus. Calculus

Check that you understand Number, Algebra in particular from yr 7–9, 10+.

There are also exercise books to practice algebra, see first three books here: Lyn Baker Algebra

If you can manage to work through the 3rd book with few hiccups, then your algebra is good enough to tackle senior high school mathematics pre-calculus and calculus.

If ready for college level mathematics, such as algebra I and calculus I, you can visit this site:

Pauls Online Math Notes

And yes, your teacher is important to make sure you know what you are doing. A common mistake a student makes is using the wrong notation. Not writing the mathematics out correctly leads to problems. The other thing you need to learn is how to find the solution to a problem based solely on the question. This is the bridge to really make things work. Knowing how to do the problem precedes the actual working (but of course you need to practice working towards the solution as well). And finally understand the idea behind why a formula works. Knowing why makes it better than memorising stuff.