I do mathematics extremely slow, what can help me do math questions faster?

Learn how to identify the "type" of problem quickly. Master arithmetic and basic algebra. Memorize commonly used facts. Learn shortcuts.

You can't be fast at all math. Solving challenging new problems takes time. However, most grade school math is actually incredibly repetitive, and is less problem solving than pattern recognition. Most teachers think "okay I need 5 of this type of problem, 3 of this type of problem, and 4 of this type of problem" when they create an assignment or an assessment. The problem is, some students will just see 12 separate problems, whereas a good math student will q

Learn how to identify the "type" of problem quickly. Master arithmetic and basic algebra. Memorize commonly used facts. Learn shortcuts.

You can't be fast at all math. Solving challenging new problems takes time. However, most grade school math is actually incredibly repetitive, and is less problem solving than pattern recognition. Most teachers think "okay I need 5 of this type of problem, 3 of this type of problem, and 4 of this type of problem" when they create an assignment or an assessment. The problem is, some students will just see 12 separate problems, whereas a good math student will quickly be able to categorize the questions and be able to start on the correct solving method quickly.

Once you've identified the problem, solving quickly usually comes down to your skill with arithmetic and algebra. Does it take you a long time to multiply? To solve a two step equation? Do you have to put simple problems into a calculator? If you're having to think while solving linear equations, you're doing it wrong. These are things that should be near automatic. You might want do some practice problems, or better, find a review game to help you get "reps" without it feeling like too much work. Identify some concepts that confuse you, and eliminate those time sinks. I know "do a lot of practice" doesn't really sound fun, but it's really nice in math class to be able to focus on coming up with creative solutions and doing "real math" instead of getting bogged down in arithmetic and basic algebra.

There's stuff that you should memorize if you want to be able to do math quickly. Single digit addition and multiplication. Perfect squares and cubes. Powers of 2. How do add and subtract fractions. Exponent rules. Difference of squares factoring. Basic geometry formulas and facts: area and perimeter of squares, rectangles, triangles, and circles. Volume of a box and other prisms. The quadratic formula. You lose so much time having to look things like this up, and memorizing helps you make connections and identify patterns you wouldn't otherwise.

There's also a lot of shortcuts out there to help you do problems quicker. For one, use the commutative property. Add and subtract in the order that's most advantageous (no, subtraction isn't commutative, but if you have 3 + 7 - 3 you can subtract 3 before you add 7.) In the same vein, multiply and divide in the order that's most advantageous.

Ultimately, speed is not the goal in math. But doing some of these things can help clear the brush to allow you to enjoy math, and help you get to do more problem solving and less fluff.

Slow and study wins the race…practicse…u will surely win but thing is that don't.get demotivated….all the best…before that practice the practiced one again an again…sonthat u gain interest…and motivated and many more..

Even I was suffering from this…I was doing mathematics..

Try to change ur technique of working…in maths..consult ur lecturers.. .

Where exactly ur lagging behind….

I think…they…r the one…who provide right solution…

Just be cool…

And ofcourse…practice makes man perfect. ..

Dnt gv up…even …ur slow….one day it will improve ur speed

Bt dnt give up

Accurate and precise answers to problems in mathematics are much more important than the speed with which we solve them. Doing more problems and having more experience improves the time it takes to do them. “Keep plugging away,” is the term my Chemistry professor in college used to say. Just keep plugging away. Don’t worry so much at the time it takes to do it. You might just have to manage your time to account for it if you love it or if you have a strong desire to learn it fully.

For I am Chinese, calculation is not a big problem for most of Chinese actually, however, I can share some my learning experience and Chinese teaching method to you. The most essential thing of studying math is that you must understand what the formula means, how they came,and in which situation it may be applied. Sometimes, you need to conclude the questions which may connect to that formula. For intance,if there is a question about “power”,you need to remind the formulas of

or logarithmic equation, etc. Besides, you also need to remember all formulas you have learned. Then, you may find that

For I am Chinese, calculation is not a big problem for most of Chinese actually, however, I can share some my learning experience and Chinese teaching method to you. The most essential thing of studying math is that you must understand what the formula means, how they came,and in which situation it may be applied. Sometimes, you need to conclude the questions which may connect to that formula. For intance,if there is a question about “power”,you need to remind the formulas of

or logarithmic equation, etc. Besides, you also need to remember all formulas you have learned. Then, you may find that it is much easier to do math questions. As others said, practice is vital as well, which is a good way to improve the speed. Do not fear mathematics. The first period of learning is difficult, but if you get over it, you will have fun with math.

you need concentration to study maths. you don't need to learn the question , just focus on the concept of the topic if your concept is clear then every question of that topic made easy for you to solve the question . If u didn't concentrate and want then after hearing some soft songs do maths it will definately help you to concentrate . Study in a funny way also help you to study well. May this will help you

Do all of your mathematics in your head. All your homework. Even the integrals involving a trig identity, a u-substitution and a decomposition into partial fractions. As much as possible, do it all in your head. Imagine ink costs a thousand dollars a liter. Only reach for a pen when you absolutely can’t hold the data in your head anymore.

4 or 5 minutes to add 22+33 and get 55?

The most likely explanation is that your sense of the time it takes you to do a problem is off (see 4 below). It almost certainly wouldn’t take you 4 or 5 minutes but you think it does because you are sensitive to how long it takes you. I would ask a teacher for an independent assessment of your calculation skills rather than relying on your own impression. You need a good picture of the problem to know if there is a problem and figure out how to improve (if you even want to).

A few thoughts on possible reasons if you really do arithmetic slowly:

  1. You are ab

4 or 5 minutes to add 22+33 and get 55?

The most likely explanation is that your sense of the time it takes you to do a problem is off (see 4 below). It almost certainly wouldn’t take you 4 or 5 minutes but you think it does because you are sensitive to how long it takes you. I would ask a teacher for an independent assessment of your calculation skills rather than relying on your own impression. You need a good picture of the problem to know if there is a problem and figure out how to improve (if you even want to).

A few thoughts on possible reasons if you really do arithmetic slowly:

  1. You are abnormally slow. There are certain disorders such as Dyscalculia. But if you are good at algebra, I’m guessing this isn’t the issue. Other reasons you may be slow are that your working memory is weak. That will hurt you when trying to add, say, 28+33, because of carrying. The good news is that you can work on this with the n-back game. Supposedly, it is the only brain game that actually can help you. If it really takes you 4–5 minutes to add 22 and 33, there very well may be something you need to look into.
  2. If I had to add 28+33, I would not do it by following the algorithm. Instead, I would note that 28+2 is 30 and 30+33 is 63 and then remove the 2 I added to get 61. This appears to be much faster, mentally, than 8+3=11 for the 1’s digit, carry the 1 to the 10s digit (2+3+1 = 6) then remember the 1 so that the answer is 61. The difference is that you need to remember 1–2 pieces of information in the first case and around 4 in the second case. Entire parts of the calculation are just sitting in your working memory (see point 1) waiting for you to finish up some other part of the calculation. There are many tricks for mental arithmetic that you can learn.
  3. You are doing algebra but you don’t really understand arithmetic as well as you think. Many students these days don’t get enough practice with basic skills. It is a shame that some of my college students, currently in calculus, can’t actually add fractions together, for example. You need to practice enough arithmetic to form an internal number line and, essentially, automate the processes as much as possible in your head (the same way you read without thinking about reading).
  4. You are actually well within the normal range of arithmetic ability. Many mathematicians and physicists I know are actually worse at arithmetic than many high school educated people. There’s nothing wrong with that.

I'm going to copy in an answer from another related question question here, because I think it can help.

...

I have two pieces of advice.

First, math is not a spectator sport. You can watch it for entertainment, but the only way to learn the game is to get out and play. It's not always about formulas, and sometimes it's hard. Sometimes you fail. Sometimes you spend hours crafting a beautiful and elegant solution to the wrong problem. When that happens: Get up, dust yourself off, turn to a new page in the notebook, and try again. When you beat a problem that has punished you, celebrate!

I'm going to copy in an answer from another related question question here, because I think it can help.

...

I have two pieces of advice.

First, math is not a spectator sport. You can watch it for entertainment, but the only way to learn the game is to get out and play. It's not always about formulas, and sometimes it's hard. Sometimes you fail. Sometimes you spend hours crafting a beautiful and elegant solution to the wrong problem. When that happens: Get up, dust yourself off, turn to a new page in the notebook, and try again. When you beat a problem that has punished you, celebrate! Fist pumps, Woot, Hoo-rah, the whole deal. It is awesome to win.

Second, I'd like to offer a snippet from the book "How To Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method" by George Pulyas. Don't be put off by the title, this book is very readable. The examples, except for one, all use high-school level geometry or less. Even if you don't understand the math of an example or two it is still very useful.

Here are the most valuable two pages of that book:


Understanding the Problem
First. You have to
understand the problem.

What is the unknown? What are the data? What is the condition?
Is it possible to satisfy the condition? Is the condition sufficient to determine the unknown? Or is it insufficient? Or redundant? Or contradictory?

Draw a figure. Introduce suitable notation.
Seperate the various parts of the condition. Can you write them down?

Devising a plan
Second. Find the connection between the data and the unknown. You may be obliged to consider auxiliary problems if an immediate connection cannot be found. You should obtain eventually a
plan of the solution.

Have you seen it before? Or have you seen the same problem in a slightly different form?
Do you know a related problem? Do you know a theorem that could be useful?
Look at the unknown! And try to think of a familiar problem having the same or a similar unknown.
Here is a problem related to yours and solved before. Could you use it? Could you use its result? Could you use its method? Should you introduce some auxiliary element in order to make its use possible?

Could you restate the problem? Could you restate it still differently? Go back to definitions.

If you cannot solve the proposed problem try to solve first some related problem. Could you imagine a more accessible related problem? A more general problem? A more special problem? An analogous problem? Could you solve another part of the problem? Keep only a part of the condition, drop the other part; how far is the unknown then determined, how can it vary? Could you derive something useful from the data? Could you think of other data appropriate to determine the unknown? Could you change the data appropriate to determine the unknown? Could you change the unknown or the data, or both if necessary, so that the new unknown and the new data are nearer to each other?

Did you use all the data? Did you use the whole condition? Have you taken into account all the essential notions involved in the problem?

Carrying out the plan
Third. Carry out your plan.

Carrying out your plan of the solution, check each step. Can you see clearly that the step is correct? Can you prove that it is correct?

Looking back
Fourth. Can you check
the result? Can you check the argument?
Can you derive the result differently? Can you see it at a glance?
Can you use the result, or the method, for some other problem?

HTH

TL;DR: I’ve been working on the same math problem for 3 years. Others have been working on it for 30 (years that is).

In my second real attempt through college, I had the joy of having Professor Ken Mitchell for my Discrete Math 1 class and Professor Appie van de Liefvoort for Discrete Math 2. Together these two courses gave students an introduction into Set Theory, Logic, Truth Tables, Proof and Rigor, Graphs (this will be important later) and their rudimentary theory, and a few other topics that I recall the subject material for but not the name. At the very end of CS191 (Discrete Math 1) we

TL;DR: I’ve been working on the same math problem for 3 years. Others have been working on it for 30 (years that is).

In my second real attempt through college, I had the joy of having Professor Ken Mitchell for my Discrete Math 1 class and Professor Appie van de Liefvoort for Discrete Math 2. Together these two courses gave students an introduction into Set Theory, Logic, Truth Tables, Proof and Rigor, Graphs (this will be important later) and their rudimentary theory, and a few other topics that I recall the subject material for but not the name. At the very end of CS191 (Discrete Math 1) we were given the extra-credit problem of finding all Hamiltonian Paths among a small digraph and then finding the path of least cost…

For those initiated in Computer Science or Graph Theory, that problem should jump out at you immediately as being digraph TSP and it is known to be NP… but we hadn’t learned that yet. I grew very, very, very curious about why this problem takes so long to solve for the optimal solution, while approximations that come within 1% of the optimum can be found relatively fast.

So I wandered into Prof. Mitchell’s office between the Fall and Spring semesters to discuss the basics of complexity and he told me that there was a problem which was in a similar state in graph theory: Graph Isomorphism. “You see,” he explained, “No one knows if its in NP, or if its in P. Some people think one thing, others think differently… but no one has been able to prove it one way or the other successfully since the 80s.”

So far it sounds interesting. I asked Prof Mitchell, “It seems so easy though. I am convinced that there is a polynomial solution.”

His response? “Betcha’ can’t prove it though.

Hmm… I do enjoy a challenge. I took up his bet.

Now, keep in mind here, I am at this point only a Freshman. I did not understand the high level mathematics being used by Babai, Luks, et al. Since I could not understand it, I enrolled in a course on Linear Algebra and started teaching myself Group Theory while using the restroom throughout the days of my freshman and sophomore years.

One night, while dreaming, I had a blast of inspiration that quite literally shook me awake and I started writing v. 1.00 of my GI solver for polynomial complexity. I started throwing sample graphs at it and was very surprised when the results lined up.

Version 2.00 was a huge refactor of 1.00 with the ability to read in graphs from text files to enable processing of larger problems. This was the end of my sophomore year.

Version 3.00 came about when testing those larger problems revealed a flaw in the method (which explained why I was having difficulty with the proof). This was the middle of my junior year.

I and my professors are now on V 4.12 which is still quite similar to version 3 but with much more features to enable proof via induction and the Pigeonhole principle (squeezing).

Solving the problem has been a journey. It has been difficult and sometimes I wonder if I’ll ever actually be done (especially since the foremost expert on the subject has been at it for 30 years) and if I am done, if I will be right. In any instance, it occupies me when I have nothing to do…

… and if I do solve it, and I am right, I will probably just find another problem to take its place.

Cheers.

PRACTICE IS ALL THAT IS REQUIRED.

This answer is going to be lengthy.

Even if you are talented in maths, but you do not do practice, you won't be able to solve problems quickly. Maths is a subject where even a less talented student can beat the more intelligent. Here hard work beats talent.

The reason that you have to practice is that if you don't practice, you will take more amount of time to solve problem because:

  • you will take time to understand the problem
  • You need more time to have the mindset of solving that problem, the approach by which you have to encounter problem and plan the steps to fi

PRACTICE IS ALL THAT IS REQUIRED.

This answer is going to be lengthy.

Even if you are talented in maths, but you do not do practice, you won't be able to solve problems quickly. Maths is a subject where even a less talented student can beat the more intelligent. Here hard work beats talent.

The reason that you have to practice is that if you don't practice, you will take more amount of time to solve problem because:

  • you will take time to understand the problem
  • You need more time to have the mindset of solving that problem, the approach by which you have to encounter problem and plan the steps to find solution.
  • You will be slow in calculation and quickly applying formulae and values. Even the basic calculations will take time

By practise you will:

  • Easily recognise the type of problem.
  • You will recollect quickly what formulae you have to use in solving, what approach you have to deal the problem with, and you will rapidly make a plan of steps in your mind to solve the problem.
  • You will quickly do calculations and use formulae; you will easily remember and recollect formula; which values you have to fill where, and you will also remember some basic calculation values so you can put those values without actual calculation.
  • In case of geometry, you would had seen such problems before, by looking at the figure, you will easily remember what to do and which theorems you have to use.
  • You will learn to skip steps and you will create shortcuts on your own. These are the shortcuts which no one teaches and are different from person to person, so it is a skill you can develop only on your own.

Practising requires time. But once you get that habit, your speed increases and you start enjoying it. The important feature of practice is that you will deal with so many problems and so many type of problems that you will get adapted to solve them. So the next time you will be about to solve problem of that type, your brain will automatically prepare itself with the knowledge you learned by practice.

Here are some tips for practising maths problems at your level.

  • Search for as much problems as possible and try to solve them all, from your textbook, other problem sets, question banks, internet,etc.
  • First do quick glance over theory and formulae within 10 mins and then start solving.
  • I have divided the maths practice into 4 different phases like 4 different levels of game.
  • At first phase of practice; do problems of a type at a time, then do problems of other types, but from same chapter. In this phase you will get doubts, get those doubts cleared by yourself of from mentor. Don't put more than 15 mins in a problem if you cannot solve it, do a star mark on the side and get that doubt cleared. Solve like these, problems of different chapters.
  • In Second phase, solve the problems of all types within a chapter and especially those which you had difficulty in solving earlier. In this stage your aim should be being able to solve all kind of problems.
  • Time for Third phase. Here you solve more and more problems one chapter at a time. Here solve topic wise question papers and problems from question bank by keeping a stopwatch by your side. This is stage where you improve your speed. Crave for more problems and solve as fast and correctly as you can.
  • And the final stage. This is where you solve test papers and any problem from any chapter. Again keep stopwatch and solve as fast as you can. Solve papers and see time you take for solving a paper, improve your time in next paper and go on doing this. Your aim here is PERFECTION. To be able to solve any problem, from any chapter, of any type, as fast as possible.
  • When you excel in final phase, you are ready to top the exams. No one can stop you.
  • The best feeling in practice is doing tick mark on problems after you solve them, or counting how many problems you solved in a session.
  • Always look for variety of problems, search for different type of problem, and solve more and more unique problems.
  • When you have gained perfection in that chapter, try to learn about that chapter in more high level; you can use internet; study in depth about that chapter and you will know more about it. Howerer this is not compulsory, but you will be at an advantage if you do it.
  • I would suggest that when you are solving problems, write formulae of that topic on a piece of paper and keep that paper in front of you, so that you can easily refer that formulae for solving problems till the stage where you don't require it.
  • Don't underestimate basic calculations; memorise squares, cubes and multiplication tables.

ALL THE BEST…