Does becoming more logical decrease one's emotion?

No. Logic is nothing more or less than a tool to arrive at truth. Actions can be driven by logic (in the sense that if I want a certain outcome, I can reason logically about what actions I should take to achieve it), but emotions can't. If an "emotional" person is a person who feels a lot of emotions, and a "logical" person is a person who uses logic to arrive at conclusions, then it is possible to be an emotional person, a logical person, both, or neither. A person who is just emotional might see a news story about a politician who kicked a puppy in San Francisco at 8 a.m. PST and then flew to Philadelphia to steal candy from a baby at 11 a.m. EST on the same day, and be angry at the politician. A person who is just logical might read the same story and realize that the story must be incorrect, because the way time zones work means that the politician would have had to have been in two places at once, but feel nothing. A person who is logical and emotional might read the story and realize that it must be incorrect, and be angry at the newspaper for lying or making a mistake, and uneasy until he or she knows for sure whether the politician kicked a puppy and stole candy from a baby. A person who is neither logical nor emotional might read the story, not realize that it is false, and not feel anything about the fact that the politician kicked a puppy and stole from a baby.

In other words, logic and emotion are not opposites, and they're not mutually exclusive.

I think I have somehow gone through that transformation process, and it's quite an interesting one.

When I was younger I used to regard myself as a very logical / rational person (majored in Computer Science by the way).

After entrance to college, I took a few Myers-Briggs personality test (online), and I've consistently got the profile of an INTP (T = thinking). I went through a relationship during my college time and I started a slow transformation that I didn't realize at the time. But after a couple of years, I took a few more Myers-Briggs tests and they all gave me INFP (F = feeling). I tho

I think I have somehow gone through that transformation process, and it's quite an interesting one.

When I was younger I used to regard myself as a very logical / rational person (majored in Computer Science by the way).

After entrance to college, I took a few Myers-Briggs personality test (online), and I've consistently got the profile of an INTP (T = thinking). I went through a relationship during my college time and I started a slow transformation that I didn't realize at the time. But after a couple of years, I took a few more Myers-Briggs tests and they all gave me INFP (F = feeling). I thought about it, and then I realized I have grown quite different from the dry, logical, rational person I used to be. I'm not sure if the relationship has changed me, or I just discovered a hidden part of myself, but I've certainly learnt many things from my ex girlfriend. People say that personality doesn't change; I think it does, to some extent.

Personality profile beside, there are notable differences in my approaches about life nowadays. I'm getting sharper in picking up how I feel about the world around me. In the past I used to do a lot of analysis in order to make a decision. The ability to "listen to your feeling" has never been with me, until that transformation. I'm also sharper at picking up people's emotions and that has helped a lot in my interpersonal relationships as well. The world has certainly become a lot more lovely place ever since I realized that the complex realm of human emotions exist and it's real and it's actually a very interesting place to step in and explore.

Becoming more emotional does come with some costs though: I could get a bit moody sometimes; I spend more time to work with emotions and right-brain stuffs and less time developing my logical / rational side; sometimes I make decisions without really understanding the rationale unless I sit down and reflect deeply about it; and I also don't like to hang out with people that are all logic and no emotions (like the old me) anymore.

I think being a more emotional person does not necessarily mean being less logical / rational. Having healthy development of both the emotional and logical parts of your brain certainly contribute significantly to your overall well-being.

Growing up, I felt I was different. I had very strong analytic ability that seemed separated from emotion. I remember the mentat in the first Dune and relating.

I remember seeing Star Trek V in a theater and instantly having a role model. Sybok, a Vulcan from a culture that valued logic and eschewed emotion chose to go against the social tradition and use his abilities for emotional healing. Granted, he was misled by a powerful monster, but he healed a lot of people along the way.

As an adult, I felt disgust and frustration at the Sheldon Cooper character - that someone supposed to be that “smar

Growing up, I felt I was different. I had very strong analytic ability that seemed separated from emotion. I remember the mentat in the first Dune and relating.

I remember seeing Star Trek V in a theater and instantly having a role model. Sybok, a Vulcan from a culture that valued logic and eschewed emotion chose to go against the social tradition and use his abilities for emotional healing. Granted, he was misled by a powerful monster, but he healed a lot of people along the way.

As an adult, I felt disgust and frustration at the Sheldon Cooper character - that someone supposed to be that “smart” could not recognize their own Asperger syndrome and compensate for it.

All of these characters are written constructs created by people that are approximating what such a character would be like.

I’ve read and taken classes on many subjects. I’ve compensated for disabilities (depression, learning and autism spectrum). The following is a construction focused on the message intended rather than the neurological accuracy:

I’ve associated “left brain” with language and analysis (“logic”). I’ve associated “right brain” with expressiveness and emotion. I’ve had moments where I’m engrossed in analysis, and my mind is not focusing on emotions at all. I’ve also had opposite moments. But it’s not either-or (aka exclusive or). I’m far happier when my analysis considers the values of current and potential emotional states of myself and others. Basically, if both halves of my brain are working together, I’m whole.

In conclusion, logic and emotion are not opposite ends of a spectrum. They are not exclusive traits. If someone is not valuing the emotions of others, that is an antisocial trait, not an analytical one.

Bonus: I’ve found that my “right brain” (the nonverbal part) is amazing at problem solving - it just can’t use words to explain how to solve them. Actions or other expressions are fine. It’s like I resign a problem to my subconscious, and then a while later I have a lead.

Edit: changed a to I

Well in my opinion, we wouldn't have had religion- that has always seemed like an emotional response to the need for purpose, and the fear of death. So there would not have been the Dark Ages of technological suppression- we would be thousands of years more advanced as a civilization. Without religion, mankind wouldn’t have been so warped as to devise a book that says “thou shalt not kill”, then go around the world slaughtering people who refused to abandon their beliefs for Christianity. People with no intention of being parents, wouldn't be popping out kids just because of the stigma and sha

Well in my opinion, we wouldn't have had religion- that has always seemed like an emotional response to the need for purpose, and the fear of death. So there would not have been the Dark Ages of technological suppression- we would be thousands of years more advanced as a civilization. Without religion, mankind wouldn’t have been so warped as to devise a book that says “thou shalt not kill”, then go around the world slaughtering people who refused to abandon their beliefs for Christianity. People with no intention of being parents, wouldn't be popping out kids just because of the stigma and shame that religion puts on abortion. Beyond religion or some emotional need for a life-purpose, there would be no reason someone unprepared would follow through with a pregnancy; That is just nonsensical!

We wouldn’t allow ourselves- as a species- to breed freely and drain the world of resources with our overpopulation.

We, also, wouldn't spend billions a year on having pets- keeping weak and old animals around for emotional/sentimental reasons! What a waste of resources that is!

I seem to think more logically and have been called out as “a robot” and “cold-hearted” for certain opinions of this world. Personally, I think we shouldn’t keep the old, sick, or genetically weak alive; It’s a total waste of resources unless there is a specific benefit (keeping someone like Stephen Hawking alive with technology, for example). We wouldn't allow anyone with allergies and other weaknesses to breed- that is just illogical. I have physical weaknesses and mental health issues like Borderline Personality Disorder that bring on things like anxiety, severe self-loathing, depression, and a disconnected feeling- so I would, certainly, be culled for the good of the species (or at the very least, sterilized). I will never benefit humanity, so there's no logical reason for me to continue to use resources. However, as the world stands, I could bring another human being into the world who is likely to suffer from similar mental and physical issues- and that’s my “right”?!? Even more ridiculous is that the government would throw money at me to help raise that child (a government assistance people abuse and taxpayers supply!). If I’m being completely candid- that is appalling! Yet, I’m the monster for thinking logically. Humans are ridiculous creatures of emotion and entitlement.

Really though, no one could truly comprehend how different the world would be, if humankind had more logic than emotion; if our logic was not governed by our emotions. This question just gets people to speculate based on their experience, knowledge, and opinions about people. I, obviously, think it would be better for humanity. I would be interested to see if anyone answers with an opposing opinion- that we as a species would be worse off for w.e. reason.

I believe that people who are more mindful of their own state including emotions are "more human." Here's why.

First of all, we are all humans equally since we belong to the same species. But I guess your question is related to the level of consciousness, which we use to differentiate ourselves from other animals.

One mistake people often make they equate consciousness with logic or abstract thinking. While in fact, consciousness is awareness: of the environment, your own state, your thoughts and feelings. More aware you are of those, more chances to act proactively you will have.

In this sense,

I believe that people who are more mindful of their own state including emotions are "more human." Here's why.

First of all, we are all humans equally since we belong to the same species. But I guess your question is related to the level of consciousness, which we use to differentiate ourselves from other animals.

One mistake people often make they equate consciousness with logic or abstract thinking. While in fact, consciousness is awareness: of the environment, your own state, your thoughts and feelings. More aware you are of those, more chances to act proactively you will have.

In this sense, animal emotional reactions are similar to an act of a robot with a particular program. As humans, we fall into this state quite often. This effect will affect both logical and emotional people. And logical people might be affected more since they often don't pay enough attention to their emotional state.

When you are not aware of your state, you can not consciously decide how to respond. When you don't respond, but react instead - how "human" are you?

P.S. I am currently experimenting with a technique which allows replacing selected emotional reactions with awareness and acceptance. I noticed that since I've started to use it, I began to behave in more "human" way.

Of course. It's far easier to do this if you acknowledge your emotions, instead of trying to repress them. People who deny their emotions are more likely to think they're behaving logically when they're just reacting emotionally. But being aware of your emotions means that you can recognize how they may be influencing you.

Logic and emotions are both useful, and logic isn't necessarily superior or more useful. Develop both so that you can use them both equally well, depending upon which is most appropriate. Sometimes we must set aside our emotions temporarily and respond to a situation logicall

Of course. It's far easier to do this if you acknowledge your emotions, instead of trying to repress them. People who deny their emotions are more likely to think they're behaving logically when they're just reacting emotionally. But being aware of your emotions means that you can recognize how they may be influencing you.

Logic and emotions are both useful, and logic isn't necessarily superior or more useful. Develop both so that you can use them both equally well, depending upon which is most appropriate. Sometimes we must set aside our emotions temporarily and respond to a situation logically, but sometimes we must set aside logic and respond to a situation with empathy and tact.

This is what I have gather from multiple books.

Thoughts create emotions. You think well, you feel well.

I also know that as a rule of thumb, that if two outcomes are logically similar, you go with the one that feels good. You might have to do a decision matrix/PMI (Pluses, Minuses, and what is interesting if lead to extreme conclusions) “analysis on it”.

Generally, you DO want to go with logic. The only thing that spearates man/woman from animals is our rational abilities.

Say your family member dies. Well, it is perfectly rational to cry… you can’t just be like “Rationally they had xyz, I knew i

This is what I have gather from multiple books.

Thoughts create emotions. You think well, you feel well.

I also know that as a rule of thumb, that if two outcomes are logically similar, you go with the one that feels good. You might have to do a decision matrix/PMI (Pluses, Minuses, and what is interesting if lead to extreme conclusions) “analysis on it”.

Generally, you DO want to go with logic. The only thing that spearates man/woman from animals is our rational abilities.

Say your family member dies. Well, it is perfectly rational to cry… you can’t just be like “Rationally they had xyz, I knew it was going to happen etc. etc.” You ARE allowed to cry — Man or Woman. The tears wont bring them back, but you are processing the family member. It’s good to feel things.

A time where emotion isn’t great is when there is argumentation and the use of fallacies, which pull your heart string away from rationality… it’s manipulative.

There was also an analogy in Ancient Greece about a chariot driver with two horses. The mind being the chariot driver and the two horses were logic and emotion. To be able to manuver through you need to know WHEN to steer your horses. They cannot go in opposite directions… so if you are taking a turn logic leads emotion, or vice versa. If you need to keep pressing forward, they should generally be in pace with each other. Neither should overbear the other…

Logic is acting with reality, as things are in this universe.

Emotion is acting the way you feel about reality, as things should be in the universe.

I don’t want to come across as too touchy-feely. But sometimes our emotions are a better guide than our intellect, particularly where the facts aren’t clear or reliable. There will be occasions in life where our feelings and instincts are telling us something important—don’t trust this person, this feels fishy, this feels good or bad—and turn out to be right where apparent facts were wrong. Emotions can be a truer basis to reason from sometimes.

At other times, we resort to emotions instead of facts because we’re emotional beings, and we have pride, anger, selfishness, sentimentality, or other

I don’t want to come across as too touchy-feely. But sometimes our emotions are a better guide than our intellect, particularly where the facts aren’t clear or reliable. There will be occasions in life where our feelings and instincts are telling us something important—don’t trust this person, this feels fishy, this feels good or bad—and turn out to be right where apparent facts were wrong. Emotions can be a truer basis to reason from sometimes.

At other times, we resort to emotions instead of facts because we’re emotional beings, and we have pride, anger, selfishness, sentimentality, or other feelings which cloud our rational judgment. I guess the trick in life is knowing which situation we are in.

Logic, reason and rational+objective thinking are NOT the only (or even always the best) tool to use in every aspect of human life and interactions.

So do not automatically reject emotions as “not to be trusted”. Just don’t use them as your sole tool for decision making (unless your child is wandering out into traffic or other “zero time to reason” situations).

Take in and experience your emotions and when they pass by…..reconsider the issue calmly using wisdom and reason. Then combine both and see if reason is more sensible than the emotion was.

IMO, that is how to make decisions in life and don

Logic, reason and rational+objective thinking are NOT the only (or even always the best) tool to use in every aspect of human life and interactions.

So do not automatically reject emotions as “not to be trusted”. Just don’t use them as your sole tool for decision making (unless your child is wandering out into traffic or other “zero time to reason” situations).

Take in and experience your emotions and when they pass by…..reconsider the issue calmly using wisdom and reason. Then combine both and see if reason is more sensible than the emotion was.

IMO, that is how to make decisions in life and don’t let others “peddle” emotions “into you”. And of course, that type of peddling happens with apparently objective information, too…..peddling objectivity.

I experience my emotions and when alone I deliberately “exercise” my emotions and sometimes I learn as a result….having made myself vulnerable with others not around to take advantage of my vulnerability.

And example: I “emotionally lived through” each of my children dying (while alone) so I could feel the emotions of that loss and be less “traumatized” if it does happen before I die. I had done that earlier regarding my parents dying and it worked very well since I saw the benefit when later they did both die (I’m 72).

I hope this helps.

They are equal in importance. That is why it is so hard to deal with either. In order to be at peace throughout life you must have both in the same amount. Even if that is to let emotions dominate for a time, you then need to let logic dictate for the same amount of time. For instance: I work all day five days a week(times eight hours a day equals 40 hours plus time to get ready and get to work 1 to 2 hours a day equals 50 hours) so I'll not work all weekend (48 hours plus the extra time you take on your friday: 2 hours equals 50 hours)

And all is nuetral. Don't work or work too much and your b

They are equal in importance. That is why it is so hard to deal with either. In order to be at peace throughout life you must have both in the same amount. Even if that is to let emotions dominate for a time, you then need to let logic dictate for the same amount of time. For instance: I work all day five days a week(times eight hours a day equals 40 hours plus time to get ready and get to work 1 to 2 hours a day equals 50 hours) so I'll not work all weekend (48 hours plus the extra time you take on your friday: 2 hours equals 50 hours)

And all is nuetral. Don't work or work too much and your balance is off and you feel out of peace.

Thanks for asking.