Do you prefer Spanish or French, why?

Both countries and both languages are beautiful. There's a certain rivality amongst them, probably 'cos they envy one's another's beauty. Spaniards call French "Los Franchutes" and "Frogs", and French say that once you cross the Pyrenees, you're in Africa. But that's mostly people from Paris who does say it. Although very much close to one another, the two display a significant differences when it comes to the ethnopsychology. French seem more sophisticated, while Spaniards may seem more crude in general. But those are nuances in life that I'm talking about, and where these differences can be

Both countries and both languages are beautiful. There's a certain rivality amongst them, probably 'cos they envy one's another's beauty. Spaniards call French "Los Franchutes" and "Frogs", and French say that once you cross the Pyrenees, you're in Africa. But that's mostly people from Paris who does say it. Although very much close to one another, the two display a significant differences when it comes to the ethnopsychology. French seem more sophisticated, while Spaniards may seem more crude in general. But those are nuances in life that I'm talking about, and where these differences can be observed. There are beautiful women both in Spain and France. Spanish women look a li'll bit more wild. Some of 'em have that harsh voice as if they were drinkin'n'smokin' since the age of 9. Some of them, even though not being entirely beautiful or looking like supermodels, can be very charming, something that a frigid Scandinavian woman cannot achieve no matters how hard she (or he) tried. In Cataluña they speak Catalán, in Galicia el Gallego, and in Andalucía they speak el Andalú(z). At the time of Mr. Franco, they were permited to speak Castellano only, otherwise La Guardia civįl might execute you on spot. Spanish language is almost entirely phonetic, and I like it very much 'cos it can be spoken by using your lips and thong only, not your throat or your inner organs, as when speaking Dutch or Danish. When someone talks to you in Spanish, you can look at him or her and you always get that which is being said straight from his or her face and mouth, where the words are supposed to be formed as sounds. In some other languages first you have to figure out where those sounds are coming from. Spanish is also an extremely fast speakable language. I knew a girl by the name of Marta la tarta, and she could rapidfire some 375 words per minute. French is not phonetic. The written word is a mile long, and you pronounce it like something that's not even alike to that which is written. They have nasal sounds like those ã in Portuguese, and they have sounds like ü in German. Still very pleasant to ear, slightly more difficult for pronunciation compared to Spanish. Spaniards were probably greater savages then French in the past. They had the famois Spanish inquisition, that nowadays derls in Holland, den Haag, and it works under the name of Sheveningen. Their main goal is to quench the last sparks of freedom in this enslaved Europe. French, on the other hand, loved to use the guillotine and separate people's heads from their bodies, but Spaniards exterminated something like a million of Indians of South and Central Americas. Just watch that movie "Aguirre Wrath of God" with that German vampire Klaus Kinski, or "Conquest of Paradise" with Cyrano de Bergerac AKA Gerard Depardieu. French police has always been brutal towards their own citizens. That's something they've inherited as some kind of by God given right from that extremely ambitious dwarf Napoleon. Just take a look on how France treated her own citizens in the movie Papillon, based on a true story and the life of Henry Charriiére. In the present times these two countries have become beauties. They've built up their own specific styles and identities, which, among the other things, can be seen in contemporary, modern architecture. Spain has Alberto Campo Baeza, France has Dominique Perrault. Spain gave us some besutiful poetry of García Lorca and Miguel Hernández, France gave us Descartes and Rousseau who said "Hell - that's another people". if I was to choose betwext the two of these countries, it'd be Spain that I'd have choosen, down south, and for one reason only. The reason is neither la fiesta nor la siesta. There's some kind of magic in that ocean of stars above your head in the warm nights, and there's this very special reason: The one of the most magnificent creatures of this World lives down there: the Andalusian horse, el caballo andalúz, Pura Raza Española. I could spend the rest of my life just sitting and watching them. It's a miracle. A true one.

As someone who is learning both French and Spanish.

I prefer French.

I think the language sounds better, more beautiful. I think it makes more sense, the grammar makes more sense, the pronunciation flows better.

As a twelve year old, I had an immediate interest in French, and I wanted to understand it and to know more about it. My interest in the language has fluctuated (at it’s lowest point when I was feeling pressure to make grades but had a not so competent, although very nice, teacher)

I found Spanish, at first, very off-putting. It did not sound nice to me at all. It sounded harder and more f

As someone who is learning both French and Spanish.

I prefer French.

I think the language sounds better, more beautiful. I think it makes more sense, the grammar makes more sense, the pronunciation flows better.

As a twelve year old, I had an immediate interest in French, and I wanted to understand it and to know more about it. My interest in the language has fluctuated (at it’s lowest point when I was feeling pressure to make grades but had a not so competent, although very nice, teacher)

I found Spanish, at first, very off-putting. It did not sound nice to me at all. It sounded harder and more forceful than French. There is a certain rhythm to French which Spanish did not have. I didn’t understand why they had two different words for ‘to be’ and a lot of things didn’t make a lot of sense. I haven’t been learning it for long, I like it better now but I had to push myself at the start (so many people speak it, such a useful language)

I also, as a little aside, think I would feel more at home in most French-speaking (particularly in Europe, but others as well) than I would in most Spanish-speaking countries. Probably too germanic for that :)

Spanish! Spanish is my second language and I don't know French. But for one thing I live in the United States and I have the opportunity to use it pretty often. There are people all over the place that speak Spanish. I've run into few people that speak French and do not also speak English in the United States. So i just can't imagine it being useful here. Plus I LOOOVE the Hispanic culture. The people I've met are so welcoming and friendly and humble. As an American I've learned so much from them, and I can't imagine not having that influence in my life. I don't know how it compares to French

Spanish! Spanish is my second language and I don't know French. But for one thing I live in the United States and I have the opportunity to use it pretty often. There are people all over the place that speak Spanish. I've run into few people that speak French and do not also speak English in the United States. So i just can't imagine it being useful here. Plus I LOOOVE the Hispanic culture. The people I've met are so welcoming and friendly and humble. As an American I've learned so much from them, and I can't imagine not having that influence in my life. I don't know how it compares to French culture, but I don't think it matters. I love the Hispanic culture, and you can communicate with way more people using Spanish than French.

French.

Portuguese is my mother language, so that learning Spanish was not really a challenge. Both languages are very similar to one another, and an average Portuguese speaker can understand quite a lot of Spanish, even if they have no previous exposure to the language. Almost all Spanish phonems are present in Portuguese (but not way around, as the later’s phonology is more complex than the former’s one). Thus, I feel as if Spanish is not really a foreign language, but rather a sibling of Portuguese, to whom I am real acquainted.

By the other hand, learning French has been being an arduous tas

French.

Portuguese is my mother language, so that learning Spanish was not really a challenge. Both languages are very similar to one another, and an average Portuguese speaker can understand quite a lot of Spanish, even if they have no previous exposure to the language. Almost all Spanish phonems are present in Portuguese (but not way around, as the later’s phonology is more complex than the former’s one). Thus, I feel as if Spanish is not really a foreign language, but rather a sibling of Portuguese, to whom I am real acquainted.

By the other hand, learning French has been being an arduous task to me. French phonology ressemble the Portuguese one a lot, as both have basically the same consonants and a similar vowel set. Yet, they are so different as a whole that a speaker of one of them can barely pick up a word of the other, despite their shared Latin origin. And that is what catches me up. French is the “rebel sibling” among the Romance languages as it is extremely divergent in both phonology and vocabulary when compared the other ones. It is also the kind of language that requires a huge amount of time and dedication to master, due to its complex verbal patterns and the quantity of irregular verbs.

I speak both. French is my mother tongue, and Spanish is a language I love.

Spanish has more variations, and is definitely a more flexible language, which makes it fun and appealing. It’s also a spoken language that has rhythm to it, and is relatively easy to learn as a (dedicated) second-language learner.

I’d have to say I prefer French, though. The complexity of the language, even though I’ve spoken it every day of my life, never ceases to amaze me. There’s a reason why it’s regarded as the language of intellectuals and modern-day philosophers: the vocabulary is so extensive, I find it easier

I speak both. French is my mother tongue, and Spanish is a language I love.

Spanish has more variations, and is definitely a more flexible language, which makes it fun and appealing. It’s also a spoken language that has rhythm to it, and is relatively easy to learn as a (dedicated) second-language learner.

I’d have to say I prefer French, though. The complexity of the language, even though I’ve spoken it every day of my life, never ceases to amaze me. There’s a reason why it’s regarded as the language of intellectuals and modern-day philosophers: the vocabulary is so extensive, I find it easier to express myself in French than in any of the other languages I speak (English, Italian and Spanish fluently, and a few others to various degrees of proficiency). It can also be a great language for humour, as possibilities for plays on words abound.

Both languages are great if you know them well. However I prefer Spanish for several reasons even though I am far less fluent in Spanish than French. For one thing it is completely phonetic which makes it much easier to learn and pronounce correctly. It’s a very poetic language and so you can learn a lot just by listening to songs and there are lots of good songs in Spanish. Spanish speakers are much more forgiving of incorrect Spanish than French speakers are of incorrect French so it’s much more pleasant to have a conversation and to feel like you are doing OK. The French unfortunately tend

Both languages are great if you know them well. However I prefer Spanish for several reasons even though I am far less fluent in Spanish than French. For one thing it is completely phonetic which makes it much easier to learn and pronounce correctly. It’s a very poetic language and so you can learn a lot just by listening to songs and there are lots of good songs in Spanish. Spanish speakers are much more forgiving of incorrect Spanish than French speakers are of incorrect French so it’s much more pleasant to have a conversation and to feel like you are doing OK. The French unfortunately tend to be very snooty about their language!

Spanish.

Why? Well, it's my first language learned and I also find that the Spanish language has many loanwords from French and Arabic. (My response is based. I am not sorry.)

The combination of the two aforementioned languages make the Spanish language sound beautiful in every spoken medium that exists.

Poetry, music, speeches, even arguments sound romantic. It's a Romance language that actually sounds romantic.

You will find that most Americans prefer Spanish we had 35m people from Latina America over the last 30 years and most American interact more with these people then even heard French.

Personally, I think both is great Romance language I find French to be prestige and classic. While Spanish is fun to the ear and fun.

Ohhhh that’s a tough one!!

I’ve lived in both Spain and France and I speak both, I can honestly say that it’s so hard to choose between them because they have different merits.

At a push I’d probably say Spanish a teeny bit more, as the country is more “easy” to live in. Siestas, parties, relaxed attitude and sun.

I like French because I like the way it sounds, but I prefer Spanish because it’s just easier for me. I sampled a French lesson on YouTube, but I wound up sticking with Spanish, because I found Spanish to be easier; plus, I’ve been speaking Spanish for way longer.

French was the second language I learned to comunicate in when I was 2 years old, until I left Europe I spend 2+ months there every year for Summer vacations in the south of France and brings back very pleasant memories, spanish was a subject in school, even though I am also fluent in it my heart is with french being my favorite