Do intelligent people know that they are intelligent without them being told so?

Well, you hear it so often that in the end you start to believe it. Although I am generally considered as being intelligent, deep inside I think I’m mediocre, but know and use the right tricks that make others perceive me as intelligent.
In other words, what I think is that people see me as more intelligent than I actually am.
Honestly? Verbally I’m extra-ordinally strong (remark: this has little to do with extreme intelligence, more with being a good listener and reader) and my theory is that my eloquence and my talent for ‘addictive story’-telling are the foudation of the perception others

Well, you hear it so often that in the end you start to believe it. Although I am generally considered as being intelligent, deep inside I think I’m mediocre, but know and use the right tricks that make others perceive me as intelligent.
In other words, what I think is that people see me as more intelligent than I actually am.
Honestly? Verbally I’m extra-ordinally strong (remark: this has little to do with extreme intelligence, more with being a good listener and reader) and my theory is that my eloquence and my talent for ‘addictive story’-telling are the foudation of the perception others have of me. I can ‘hide’ nearly any subject into an attractive story that quickly makes people curious and makes them shut up the others to be sure to hear how it ends.
Very honestly? I often see myself as a fraud.

if one doesnt realize by himself that he is more intelligent than others, then he is not intelligent too.

Intelligent people never waste time to know about himself

From the way they tackle problems when discussing.

I have previously written more answers on this. Here are some ways in which more intelligent people think:

1. Symbolic thought

The simplest sign of intelligence is being able to clearly tell what is literal and what is symbolic or metaphorical, and be able to discuss about that concept without necessarily being involved in it.

In the words of the Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it

Here is one more subtle application of this in everyday life:

If you refer to nuc

From the way they tackle problems when discussing.

I have previously written more answers on this. Here are some ways in which more intelligent people think:

1. Symbolic thought

The simplest sign of intelligence is being able to clearly tell what is literal and what is symbolic or metaphorical, and be able to discuss about that concept without necessarily being involved in it.

In the words of the Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it

Here is one more subtle application of this in everyday life:

If you refer to nuclear physics to less intelligent people, they will think that you are a nuclear physicist. Conversely, they will be having trouble understanding how it is possible to talk about nuclear physics if you are not a nuclear physicist. And they think same with specialised subjects like medicine, law, or business. Well, it has been happening like this since he beginning of mankind. Less intelligent people cannot do it due to their personal limitations.

An exploitation of this cognitive deficiency is partly what famously allowed Frank Abagnale[1] to impersonate doctors, pilots, lawyers, and other people of profession, by simply talking and behaving like them. Other people thought that because he acted like the professionals he imitated, he was one, and could not ever imagine the opposite.

In is even possible that this is inability is behind the success of what is called “social engineering”

I would argue however that this ability is not the product of education, but mostly an innate, genetic ability related to intelligence. It may have just happened that those who were educated in Ancient Greece were only the most intelligent, likely happening through some selection process.

2. Two way relationships

More intelligent people do not understand two way relationships. Here is a question:

If you are a basketball player, you are likely taller than average. If you are taller than average, are you likely a basketball player?

Some people would connect one to the other. In reality, they are different concepts. Mistakes like this are so common not only in everyday thinking, but even in scientifically validated articles and high level business talks.

3. Cause and effect

There is a cause of happenings. Less intelligent people cannot think in terms of cause-and-effect, and this again seems to be a genetic deficiency. Interestingly, it just happens that many people who support left-orientated political parties do not have this ability at all.

Cause-and-effect is about determining what caused something, as well as what did not. The common mistake less intelligent people make is to consider correlations as causal relationships.

Anything can be correlated to something else, by default. This does not mean that one causes the other. Even if they do, there is a chain of events. This type of mistake is also known as “correlation is not causation”. Here is one example:

Being good at this skill, particularly understanding cause and effect in complex scenarios, is fundamental for understanding chain reactions, including chemical reactions, including those happening in the brain, such as how neurotransmitters are produced, as well as how food is broken down etc.

4. Complex, Multiaxiomatic logic

A logical syllogism begins with an axiom, and uses logical methods such as induction, deduction and abduction in order to bring further conclusions, which are said to logically follow from their premises.

The ability to make logical syllogisms is also genetic and built into some people’s way of processing information.

People of low intelligence hardly make basic logical syllogisms. People of average intelligence make logical syllogisms based on some axioms, and apply the logical method correctly.

People of high intelligence can make logical syllogisms, but also take into account the limitations of logic. They know that the results depend on the premises and ultimately the axioms. Very often logic is used incorrectly by intelligent people as its roots are personal axioms. In other words, the fact that something is logical not only does not mean that the conclusion is valid. It can be extremely biased, and even false within the current context.

5. Multi-valued logic

This can be seen from [2]

the number of conclusions when evaluating a statement:

  • Less intelligent people use 2 conclusions: True or False
  • More intelligent people use 3 conclusions: True, False, Unknown

When less intelligent (note re edit: “Smart” does not need to be capatalized, also redundancy of terminology in research writing provides clarity for the reader and is preferred amongst academics) people don’t know about something, they treat it as False. However, using 3 instead of 2 conclusions makes all thought frameworks much richer, precise and valid, but also much more complex.

From the original observation, it could be assumed that less intelligent people can only understand and use binary logic in their thought process, but more intelligent people can understand and use ternary logic, or even higher order n-ary logic. Three-valued logic - Wikipedia

This phenomenon is probably very related to confidence and the Dunning-Kruger effect.

6. Interpersonal intelligence

Interpersonal intelligence is[3]

To understand intersubjectivity, be able to differentiate between the individual participants in the cognitive conversation, and the role and actions of each. Effectively present the interaction as it happened, avoiding what I call ”interpersonal fallacies”.

Interpersonal fallacies are fallacies which happen when people confuse the actors, roles and opinions in a conversation. Typical examples are thinking that what one says is what the other also thinks, getting confused in the exchange of I and You, and ignoring the subjectivity of the observations of the actors.

The more actors are considered in a cognitive conversation, the number of true and false statements, situations and scenarios increases exponentially. A less intelligent person doesn’t have the capacity to perceive enough distinct actors acting simultaneously due to such cognitive incapacities.

For example, a less intelligent person may perceive that when they talk with another, there is them (an I), the other participant (a You), and perhaps a third person (an Other) as all the actors in the conversation.

For a more intelligent person there are many more independent actors perceived in the same conversation above: I, what I think You are, what I think the Other is, what You think You are, what You think I am, what You think the Other is, and so on.

Multiply the number of actors by their actions to see how significantly more complex it is thinking in the latter way.

It is a different type of intelligence which is also calculatable and testable. I am the first person to define this type of intelligence, and the inventor of this type of psychometric assessment.

7. Quantifiability vs Generalisation

This is possibly what makes the cut between intelligent people and highly intelligent people.

Here is an example of generalisation: “All men are chauvinistic pigs”. This sentence is false by definition. A more quantified version could be “30% of men are chauvinists”, ideally backed by correct data.

The true sign of skill in this area is shown when asking someone a question like those previously asked by Google on hiring interviews:

  • “How many piano tuners are there in the entire world?”
  • “How many vacuums are made per year in the US?”
  • “How many golf balls can fit in a school bus?”

Most people will immediately react to these questions as “they are unanswerable”. They are not, and there is even a method to answer them, which highly intelligent people in certain areas can do automatically.

8. Purpose and Gain

This was brilliantly described by Italian economist Carlo M. Cipolla in his essay “The Basic Laws of stupidity”[4] . It is such a defining factor for intelligence, that could even call for a redefinition of the word.

Here is a diagram from this essay:

Intelligence is often described as “the processing and collection of information”. There is a problem with this definition in that doing exactly as it states can lead not only to useless results, but actually be destructive for the performer and others.

The reason is that purpose and gain are missing.

Why process and why collect information? And most of all, what is there to gain for the person who does it? A person who works hard doing things that are not giving themselves benefit, and even worse causing them losses, is _______ (I recommend this verbiage: lacks foresight or lacks situational awareness) [These statements are more empirical]

Too many people have not realised that they are doing this. Intelligent people, and particularly executives, always think of how they can gain from what they do, and ideally how others will gain too.

(This is well written and well supported. You appear to be a subject matter expert. I recommend fleshing out your section on logic and tying up your missives with a formal conclusion, then submitting to academic journals if you are so inclined)

Footnotes

  • They listen and observe a lot more than they speak and act. A lot of their energy is used up thinking and so they often do not have enough to spare for continuous work. And so, they often sit passively and quietly until they feel that action is necessary.
  • They have a passive and somewhat effortless authority about them. They will not give orders or be rude, nor offensive to establish dominance within a social group. But when you speak to someone who is intelligent, you will have no choice but to tailor your conversations and behaviours around them, otherwise you will feel very out of your eleme
  • They listen and observe a lot more than they speak and act. A lot of their energy is used up thinking and so they often do not have enough to spare for continuous work. And so, they often sit passively and quietly until they feel that action is necessary.
  • They have a passive and somewhat effortless authority about them. They will not give orders or be rude, nor offensive to establish dominance within a social group. But when you speak to someone who is intelligent, you will have no choice but to tailor your conversations and behaviours around them, otherwise you will feel very out of your element.
  • They work efficiently and not endlessly. Intelligent people are more able to construct workable systems and routines that efficiently and innovatively give them the same results as someone whom would be working all day and every day.
  • The constant need for intellectual stimulation means that most of their hobbies will either be creative, or things that allow to continuously learn new skills. Reading is a clear indicator.
  • They are extremely patient. Their intelligence allows them to not fall under pressure as easily, withstand long periods of low activity, and can last longer in otherwise very mentally exhausting situations than someone whom is perhaps not as intelligent.
  • Very resourceful. They are able to produce shockingly adequate results with less time, money, and overall energy exertion. A lot of intelligent people actually become lazy for this reason.
  • Can pick up talents very easily. Their ability to observe, analyse, break down into steps, and apply means that they can learn very quickly any skill required. Intelligent people can ironically feel impatient in this regard. For if they cannot learn a skill straight away, they often fear that they will not know how to deal with the environment adequately and so will not go there.
  • Extremely socially influential. In groups, the intelligent person is usually the very quiet one whom seldom gives their own opinion, or contributes to conversations. However, when asked for input, they usually say something that cuts to the heart of the matter and changes everyone's perspective.
  • Very morally disciplined people. I say perhaps stubborn. But intelligent need a moralistic and philosophical structure to which to function in. Intelligent people do not see the world in terms of what work there is to do or what money there is to be made, because the intelligent person often fears that he will crack under the pressure of his own conscious activity. To compensate, you will find intelligent people always contemplating new philosophical or abstract moral concepts to build and live by. They live inside their heads and so I guess they need their interior structure up to scratch.
  • Intelligent people are often mistaken for being insane and mentally challenged. Some even go as far as to use high intelligence as a diagnostic symptom of a personality disorders or learning disability.
  • Often tired all of the time despite doing what looks like no work.
  • Their work ethic is different. Intelligent people work less, they don't have the energy otherwise. So they are often quite good delegators, with efficient planning skills.
  • Very calm in crisis.
  • Skilled debators. The secret to intelligent debating is being able to articulate your own perspective accurately rather than to argue aggressively.
  • Able to talk themselves in and out of any situation.
  • Are not threatened by social groups. Their skill in conversation and analysing social environments means they are able to talk to many different kinds of people and gain their respect.

Are non-intelligent people, intelligent enough to know they are not that smart?

Quite the contrary, actually. Most presume they’re smarter than average.

At a young age, most kids are indoctrinated to believe they’re super smart, super talented, super everything. Intelligent kids usually grow out of it fairly readily and realize that, at best, they’re average, maybe a little under.

Less intelligent individuals might live to 100 years of age and never have the realization that their parent figure was blowing smoke up their butt trying to build their confidence and keep them motivated to keep trying

Are non-intelligent people, intelligent enough to know they are not that smart?

Quite the contrary, actually. Most presume they’re smarter than average.

At a young age, most kids are indoctrinated to believe they’re super smart, super talented, super everything. Intelligent kids usually grow out of it fairly readily and realize that, at best, they’re average, maybe a little under.

Less intelligent individuals might live to 100 years of age and never have the realization that their parent figure was blowing smoke up their butt trying to build their confidence and keep them motivated to keep trying.

I know a gent right now who paints a LOT. He’s in his ’50s and he frequently credits his mom with helping build his confidence to keep painting.

There’s only one tiny little minuscule problem…he’s not good at painting. At all. Some of his stuff is bad enough that from a distance you might think it was a Dali piece, a really highbrow work…but then you look closer and realize it’s bad, but it’s not bad on purpose. Art that’s bad is good, but only if it’s bad intentionally. His is bad because he sucks at painting and his end up looking that bad solely by accident.

He simply lacks the mental acuity to realize she was (and is) falsely inflating his capability as a painter because it would hurt his feelings if she told him the plain truth. As a result, he’s quite certain that anyone who won’t buy one of his works is, you guessed it, too stupid to appreciate the quality.

If he had a little more going on in the attic beyond slow mold growth, he’d probably realize that if 300 people see your work in a gallery you weren’t selected for (he got in on the “pay your way” plan) and you don’t sell a single piece…maybe the buyers aren’t entirely the problem.

His opinion on his own intelligence is similarly inflated, for the same reason. The thought has never and will never cross his mind that he’s not the smartest person in the room.

Generally speaking:

  • Stupid people will never realize the difference between genuine praise and familial praise. A parent or caregiver endeavors to give them a little confidence (which is a good thing for a parent figure to do) and the kid never catches on that it was just a parent doing a parent thing.
  • Smart people do realize the difference between genuine praise and familial praise. At some point they realize that their parent was trying to bolster their confidence, and this then tends to tilt them the other way; they presume they’re not as good as they’ve been told, and they strive to become even better.

I’m by no means a genius, but I am smart enough to know I don’t know everything. Recently, I’ve taken it upon myself to learn investing principles and start investing (and I’m doing it the hard way as those investments are super tiny) to make my money work for me and grow into something.

A dumb person never assumes they need to know more than they do because they already think they know everything. This, in turn, not only illustrates how little they know, but insulates them from learning more!

There are stupid people who think they are geniuses, and there are geniuses who think they are stupid. But that's not the norm, thank God (especially in the case of the stupid).

That's because intelligence—of whatever kind, as measured by IQ or EQ—is but a trait of the overall personality, so it's organically integrated with the other traits and conditions, through the neurological system. Thus, there are multiple reasons why one can be very intelligent but shy, awkward, cowardly and what not, in any sense of being intelligent.

Because that's another question, what is it to be intelligent? Not,

There are stupid people who think they are geniuses, and there are geniuses who think they are stupid. But that's not the norm, thank God (especially in the case of the stupid).

That's because intelligence—of whatever kind, as measured by IQ or EQ—is but a trait of the overall personality, so it's organically integrated with the other traits and conditions, through the neurological system. Thus, there are multiple reasons why one can be very intelligent but shy, awkward, cowardly and what not, in any sense of being intelligent.

Because that's another question, what is it to be intelligent? Not, certainly, to excel at IQ tests. If you don't, you can hardly be intelligent, but even if you do, you can still be a consummate fool. I have a long list of the foolish things officially intelligent people have done, such as Steven jobs cancer treatment, Elon Musk's avowed personal failings, Isaac Newton and alchemy, Einstein's family life, and so on and so forth.

But they accepted being intelligent, even if humbly. Others do so very proudly, just look to answers here on Quora, how arrogantly, even condescendingly, they state their superiority, sometimes to the extreme of declaring the questions to be stupid (as if doing so wasn't stupid itself). Nevertheless, there are multiple reasons why some particular bright people will not accept their intelligence. For example, they may suffer from an inferiority complex, which —due to early experiences in life, or any other reason—makes then feel precisely that, inferior, inadequate—and not only in the intellectual aspect—in spite of all the evidence against. And then there are the really intelligent people, who precisely because they are really intelligent realize that even though in relation to their human peers they are extremely gifted, at cosmological scale they are pitiful.

Anyhow, in my view—which may well be silly, but I don't think so—, the most intelligent thing you can do is just to ignore this issue. As I say, it's about what you are as a person. Our attitude towards this particular characteristic should be guided by hyper-intellectual considerations. That's what the Spanish mystic Teresa of Avila did (and she is saint). She gave us the perfect formula: Andar en la verdad = go by the truth (my translation, using 'go by' as in 'a good rule to go by'). And above all, never assume to be what we are not, whether we think it to be good or bad!

People aren't going to like my answer, but here it goes. Read the comments as well please.

This is a tough question, but let me try to break it down in a way that clarifies it. Let’s say that all babies are born with the exact same level of intelligence (this isn’t the case, but let’s keep things simple). None of them can speak, control their movements, have any idea of anything (all arguable, but let's go with it lol), etc.

However, there are unseen differences between babies that will lead certain individuals to be more or less intelligent than average. There are MANY biological traits that co

People aren't going to like my answer, but here it goes. Read the comments as well please.

This is a tough question, but let me try to break it down in a way that clarifies it. Let’s say that all babies are born with the exact same level of intelligence (this isn’t the case, but let’s keep things simple). None of them can speak, control their movements, have any idea of anything (all arguable, but let's go with it lol), etc.

However, there are unseen differences between babies that will lead certain individuals to be more or less intelligent than average. There are MANY biological traits that confer to one's intelligence, let's pick a common, easy one: brain plasticity.

Plasticity is the brain's ability to create (and destroy) connections between neurons. Our genetics determine how plastic our brains are (like it or not). A person born with better plasticity than another person, is highly likely to be more intelligent. Now, many would argue (and probably will), that with practice, one can improve their own brain's plasticity. I agree, this IS possible, but, how much one's plasticity can be improved upon, depends, once again, on your genetics. 2 hrs of "plastic training" may increase one person's plasticity by 50% but only 10% in another person.

Now, having said that, let's talk about nurture. We all like to believe that a nurturing environment is ultimately what determines a person's intelligence. This is partially true. A nurturing environment is only going to push a person to their genetic limit. Harsh, I know, but hear me out. If you take a person who has a low IQ, no matter how much nurturing you provide, that individual will never reach genius level. In fact, if you take an average IQ person and provide a nurturing environment, they still won't reach genius level. They will improve, yes, but genius? They will never be. (True geniuses are rare occurrences and often times, the differences (if any) in their brains is not obvious.) On the flip side of that coin, there are those whose biological traits destine them to be intelligent. For example, the person who goes to a bad school system and isn't nurtured at home, displays intelligence that rivals the greatest minds that have walked the earth.

So, now that I've talked about the exceptions, let's talk about the average person. Most of us will have average intelligence and due to our genetic traits, some of us will be better than others in various areas. For many of us, a proper environment will push us to our intellectual limits.

This is all to say that we were born with the same level intelligence, but not with the same level of, what I call, "intellectual potential".

So, to answer your question, let me first rephrase it:

Are some people born with more intellectual potential than others?

Absolutely.

Their environment will determine how much of that potential is reached.

More often than not, other people notice them first. Intelligent people never think they are very smart or intelligent and that they are something extraordinary or somehow superior than others. They just carry on with their habits or patterns that they follow and keep on increasing their knowledge and awareness throughout their lives.

People always want to find intelligent people among them or in any group. So if you are in school, you tend to look for smartest kid. If you are an employee, you tend to look for smartest employee in company. You tend to look for smartest celebrity, smartest polit

More often than not, other people notice them first. Intelligent people never think they are very smart or intelligent and that they are something extraordinary or somehow superior than others. They just carry on with their habits or patterns that they follow and keep on increasing their knowledge and awareness throughout their lives.

People always want to find intelligent people among them or in any group. So if you are in school, you tend to look for smartest kid. If you are an employee, you tend to look for smartest employee in company. You tend to look for smartest celebrity, smartest politician, smartest sportsman, smartest businessman and so on.

Its a inherent trait in all people to look for ideals and leaders and somebody to look up to. Smart people do that too. They look up to other people they think are smarter and get motivation and inspiration from them.

I don't think anyone out there thinks they are the smartest and he thinks that's it, the buck stops here, I am the smartest, period.

Other people label you smart or intelligent, you don't do it yourself. Because there are always some people smarter than you.

Some people say Intelligent people are born that way. But I disagree. May be they are special but they do work hard and they do have some specific traits.

Intelligence comes from Knowledge and Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working and experience). Intelligent people knowingly or unknowingly follow this logic. Here are some of the traits that smart people carry on. They would follow most or all of the these traits.

  • Intelligent people ask many questions.
  • Intelligent people read a lot.
  • Intelligent people learn a lot.
  • Intelligent people grasp a lot
  • Intelligent people dig deep, they go in detail.
  • Intelligent people focus on raising their awareness, 360 degree awareness.
  • Intelligent people are interested in variety of things, not just one subject.
  • Intelligent people work hard.
  • Intelligent people experiment. They fail and fail again to achieve success.
  • Intelligent people explore.
  • Intelligent people stay focused.
  • Intelligent people have fun.
  • Intelligent people are mix of artistry and technicality - some are more artistic than technical and vice versa, but they do use both sides of their brain - logical side and artistic side.
  • Intelligent people adapt change, they do not resist it.
  • Intelligent people think out of the box
  • Intelligent people are open minded

If someone does have most of the above traits, you can consider them to be smart enough.

Intelligent people always know that they are not intelligent, its just something other people think about them. So you can always observe some specific traits and tell if someone is smart or not.

Some people say Intelligent people are born that way. But I disagree. May be they are special but they do work hard and they do have some specific traits.

Intelligence comes from Knowledge and Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working and experience). Intelligent people knowingly or unknowingly follow this logic. Here are some of the traits that smart people carry on. They would follow most or a

Intelligent people always know that they are not intelligent, its just something other people think about them. So you can always observe some specific traits and tell if someone is smart or not.

Some people say Intelligent people are born that way. But I disagree. May be they are special but they do work hard and they do have some specific traits.

Intelligence comes from Knowledge and Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working and experience). Intelligent people knowingly or unknowingly follow this logic. Here are some of the traits that smart people carry on. They would follow most or all of the these traits.

  • Intelligent people ask many questions.
  • Intelligent people read a lot.
  • Intelligent people learn a lot.
  • Intelligent people grasp a lot
  • Intelligent people dig deep, they go in detail.
  • Intelligent people focus on raising their awareness, 360 degree awareness.
  • Intelligent people are interested in variety of things, not just one subject.
  • Intelligent people work hard.
  • Intelligent people experiment. They fail and fail again to achieve success.
  • Intelligent people explore.
  • Intelligent people stay focused.
  • Intelligent people have fun.
  • Intelligent people are mix of artistry and technicality - some are more artistic than technical and vice versa, but they do use both sides of their brain - logical side and artistic side.

If someone does have most of the above traits, you can consider them to be smart enough.

Intelligence has nothing to do with the ability to answer questions or how successful you have been. Just because you know somethings (technical or otherwise) does not qualify you as intelligent.

Your level of "Awareness" defines your level of Intelligence.
Measure the level of Awareness, and you can tell how intelligent someone is.

Assuming - by smart, you mean Intelligence, and not "cleverness".

More aware you are, of yourself, of your surroundings - better off you are than the rest. It changes your perspective, it opens door for your growth and it makes you amazingly smart.

Awareness comes from Knowledge. Knowledge comes from practice (learning, working, experience).

Evolution theory supports this narrative. Humans became more aware thru acquired knowledge thru practice, than the rest of living chain and thus became more intelligent. You can apply the same awareness principal to individuals.

You are only intelligent if you are aware. All living forms have some level of awareness and hence some level of intelligence. There are, of course, different levels of Awareness one can achieve and hence we have different levels of intelligence among all living beings and among all human beings.

Buddha, Mohammad, Christ reached a new level of awareness that gave birth to new religions.

Darwin reached a new level of awareness that gave birth to Theory of Evolution and our better yet understanding of life on earth.

Albert Einstein reached a new level of awareness that gave birth to Theory of Relativity and our better yet understanding of the Universe.
The highest form of intelligence is Awareness.

How much aware are you - about yourself, about surroundings, about everything, about existence? Whoever reaches a new peak of awareness - is worshiped for generations.

Measure their level of Awareness, and you can tell how smart someone is.

1. When you find one smart person you'll find others. Ask for an intro! A great question is "who else should I know?"

2. Smart people tend to like things like museums, music, and hackathons. Hang out there and you'll find more smart people than in many other places. MakerFaire, for instance, was PACKED with smart people who were trying to build things. One of Microsoft's best researchers was there helping out, by the way.

3. Smart people tend to be employed at research labs. Get into one by IBM or Microsoft and you'll find freaking smart people.

4. TED and the World Economic Forum, among other ev

1. When you find one smart person you'll find others. Ask for an intro! A great question is "who else should I know?"

2. Smart people tend to like things like museums, music, and hackathons. Hang out there and you'll find more smart people than in many other places. MakerFaire, for instance, was PACKED with smart people who were trying to build things. One of Microsoft's best researchers was there helping out, by the way.

3. Smart people tend to be employed at research labs. Get into one by IBM or Microsoft and you'll find freaking smart people.

4. TED and the World Economic Forum, among other events, tend to have very smart people, but those cost a lot of money and you gotta get invited.

5. Twitter has many of the world's smartest people.

6. Quora has lots of the world's smartest people. I should make a list.

7. Always get to know people sitting next to you in planes. One day I was in the last row on a Alaska Air flight. Might have thought "no one smart is possibly sitting in the last row," right? But it was the VP of engineering at Amazon.

8. Hang out at media outlets. Smart people tend to be called up to do interviews. In the tech industry you will always meet interesting people in the Techcrunch hallway.

9. Book launch events. Generally authors are pretty smart. It's hard to write a book, certainly on a single topic. Lots of times authors give speeches at local book stores. I remember when one famous author only had 10 people in the audience and he was very smart. Glad I went.

10. At universities or colleges. Smart people love learning.

I’m going to approach your question from a different angle and see what happens so bear with me…

There’s a well documented psychological phenomenon known as the Dunning-Krueger Effect, which describes a person with limited experience in a field (i.e. someone too new to something to be competent yet) underestimating the complexity of the skills and knowledge demanded by competence in that field, due to their lack of exposure and knowledge of what being competent in that field entails.

As such, people who are new to something have a tendency to overestimate their own capabilities until they reach

I’m going to approach your question from a different angle and see what happens so bear with me…

There’s a well documented psychological phenomenon known as the Dunning-Krueger Effect, which describes a person with limited experience in a field (i.e. someone too new to something to be competent yet) underestimating the complexity of the skills and knowledge demanded by competence in that field, due to their lack of exposure and knowledge of what being competent in that field entails.

As such, people who are new to something have a tendency to overestimate their own capabilities until they reach the point of realising ‘whoa, there’s more to this than I thought…’. Simultaneously, we also downplay the proficiency of other people who have more experience than us as a result of the perceived simplicity of the job at this early stage.

The result of this is that as competence at something increases, the way we perceive our competence actually decreases, because you start to understand how much more is left to learn.

If we take what this phenomenon says about people and apply it to your question, we can guess that - generally - people will be more inclined to overestimate their own capabilities and underestimate those of others. The real-world evidence of daily life definitely seems to bear this assumption out, and it seems to be the most intelligent people who are the least assured of their own intelligence.

Think Socrates: ‘The only thing I know for sure, is that I know nothing’.