Are higher IQ people more pretentious?

I have divided two kinds of smart people so far:

  1. The braggers (called losers by Hawkings)
  2. The ascended ones.

The first ones are actually on the same layer as a 90–110 person, bragging does nothing, and so far they haven’t understood more complex thoughts and have little to none wisdom.

The second ones are too busy thinking or doing something important to have time to brag, they are humble with everyone, and understand people is different. They also think more about humanity’s future, philosophy and have an amazing wisdom, a quora answer will not be enough to describe the amazing they are. I am not

I have divided two kinds of smart people so far:

  1. The braggers (called losers by Hawkings)
  2. The ascended ones.

The first ones are actually on the same layer as a 90–110 person, bragging does nothing, and so far they haven’t understood more complex thoughts and have little to none wisdom.

The second ones are too busy thinking or doing something important to have time to brag, they are humble with everyone, and understand people is different. They also think more about humanity’s future, philosophy and have an amazing wisdom, a quora answer will not be enough to describe the amazing they are. I am not saying “average” people cannot get to those thoughts though.

I was on the first kind. But I finally understood that it was time to “ascend” and started to focus on things that will be useful for other people.

Farewell.

Sometimes. But I’ve met a lot more obviously really smart people who are quite humble, and a lot more people of average intelligence who are very pretentious.

In my experience, the most pretentious people I’ve met are in the somewhat higher IQ category. The ones who’ve joined something like Mensa that requires you pass an intelligence test of some kind. The kind of people who find some excuse to tell you how intelligent they are. They seem to feel they have something to prove.

I’m not talking about people who will share cool thoughts and knowledge.

So, in general, I’d say no, people with higher I

Sometimes. But I’ve met a lot more obviously really smart people who are quite humble, and a lot more people of average intelligence who are very pretentious.

In my experience, the most pretentious people I’ve met are in the somewhat higher IQ category. The ones who’ve joined something like Mensa that requires you pass an intelligence test of some kind. The kind of people who find some excuse to tell you how intelligent they are. They seem to feel they have something to prove.

I’m not talking about people who will share cool thoughts and knowledge.

So, in general, I’d say no, people with higher IQ are not pretentious, but it is possible.

The problem here is we have bias based on confirmation. It is all about observation For example smokers are the ones who leave butts everywhere so smokers litter.

People who share their IQs are pretentious they are the smokers that do the littering. The smart people that don’t leave a mess are going to go under the radar you will possibly never catch them being pretentious.

High IQ:

  • You maintained good grades throughout college without much difficulty. In at least 1–2 subjects, you excelled far beyond the average, scoring in the 95th percentile with consistent ease. You are attracted to graduate studies, and read independently on topics you enjoy.
  • If you didn’t excel in school, you were uncommonly talented in another area (sports, art, etc.). You were self taught in this area, learning by example and intuition until someone recognized your ability and encouraged it (hopefully).
  • You can predict what a person is going to say after just a few words, and you can infer t

High IQ:

  • You maintained good grades throughout college without much difficulty. In at least 1–2 subjects, you excelled far beyond the average, scoring in the 95th percentile with consistent ease. You are attracted to graduate studies, and read independently on topics you enjoy.
  • If you didn’t excel in school, you were uncommonly talented in another area (sports, art, etc.). You were self taught in this area, learning by example and intuition until someone recognized your ability and encouraged it (hopefully).
  • You can predict what a person is going to say after just a few words, and you can infer their beliefs based on what they say. This means you’re often bored, waiting for someone to finish a sentence when you knew from the start what the point would be. You recognize common arguments people use and reuse.
  • You perform well in situations that require you to process a lot of information rapidly. Even in a fast food or retail position, you complete tasks and learn skills much faster than your peers.
  • You read quickly and enjoy reading. You can easily articulate your thoughts in speech. You have opinions which others regard as novel, controversial, or interesting.
  • You have a hard time finding friends. The friends you do have are intelligent, and you spend a lot of time talking about ideas, or working on projects together.

Average IQ:

  • You don’t really think about your intelligence that much. It’s perfectly sufficient for most tasks, and rarely a hindrance. There are some things you know you simply can’t do, for example high level math or writing a best selling novel. But these things likely aren’t very appealing to you anyways.
  • If you worked hard in school, you got good grades. If you didn’t work hard, you got bad grades. Overall, academic performance is more a measure of will than intellect at this level. Average intelligence students can get straight As if they put in the work, but aren’t likely to excel at the graduate level and beyond. School is rarely easy but usually manageable.
  • You have a broad social network. Even if you’re introverted, it’s not hard to find people you relate to and can have conversations with. If you’re extraverted, you fit in most places without trouble and have many friends.
  • You have at least one talent or exceptional skill, but it required time and effort to develop.
  • A small number of people are markedly smarter than you, which may make you feel insecure. However, you’ll probably see more clearly than the intelligent person themselves how they are deficient in other areas.

Low IQ:

  • You hated school, experiencing it as a set of arbitrary and mysterious challenges with no clear value. You don’t really understand why you had to learn math, or read the Great Gatsby. You were very happy to leave high school, at least the academic parts. The prospect of college level education is intimidating at best, repellant at worst.
  • You prefer to take direction from someone else at work and at school. In your personal life, you often seek advice from parents and mentors, even for simple matters. You prefer this advice to be highly detailed and “step by step” rather than broad and theoretic. If youre too proud to seek help, youre often frustrated when your actions don’t produce the results you expected. You may have failed relationships or grave financial errors in your past. You may fall for scams and con artists.
  • You place high value on human relationships. You’re more likely to enjoy spending time with friends than on solitary intellectual activities such as reading, writing, or practicing an instrument. Sitting with a group and having a normal, pleasant conversation is very engaging.
  • You often make mistakes at your job, even when you try your best. Your manager gets mad and it stresses you out, but still it happens again and again. This kind of humiliation is possibly the most painful aspect of low intelligence.
  • If you’re overloaded with information at a stressful moment, you tend to shut down and withdraw completely.
  • You’re not obviously talented at anything in particular. Even in your hobbies, you’re not exceptional. This is unless you have an exceptional work ethic - and I do know below average people who have accomplished exceptional things.

They have a great vocabulary though they might choose to hide it depending on the context (so they don’t alienate people accidentally).

They know a lot of geographical and historical facts like who the president of the United States was during the world wars, or the names of different types of minerals, or the names of famous kings, queens, and tyrants from all across time and space. (Though again, unless you invited them to trivia night, you might not ever notice this.) People with high IQs sometimes feel like they have to minimize certain aspects of their personality to avoid accidentally tri

They have a great vocabulary though they might choose to hide it depending on the context (so they don’t alienate people accidentally).

They know a lot of geographical and historical facts like who the president of the United States was during the world wars, or the names of different types of minerals, or the names of famous kings, queens, and tyrants from all across time and space. (Though again, unless you invited them to trivia night, you might not ever notice this.) People with high IQs sometimes feel like they have to minimize certain aspects of their personality to avoid accidentally triggering insecurities and conflicts with peers and superiors.

They can compare and contrast ideas they discuss recognizing the most important features of those ideas and drawing connections between them and what might seem like unrelated ideas or factoids.

For instance, they might make observations of the current political climate in the United States and draw connections to political movements throughout history that shared some number of important features with what we all observe today. From there, they might infer possible future outcomes of today’s political processes based on their knowledge of how things like this have gone before. Again, many people with high IQs have learned the hard way that they can seriously damage relationships with acquaintances very easily and quite accidentally by offering sharing their analysis at the wrong time or with the wrong folks. People capable of very high levels of analysis and synthesis may reach conclusions that are politically or socially threatening to others. Think of Copernicus getting excommunicated by the church after realizing that the sun (and not the earth) is actually at the center of our universe.

People with very high IQs have to learn intellectual gentleness in order to get along with people. Kind of like people who are unusually physically large have to learn to move in ways that are slower and gentler to help everyone around them feel safe. As a result, you might work with someone for years without hearing or seeing these parts of their personality.

Here are two perfect examples to compare. First, though, I want to mention that I do not know the IQ of the two examples below, but I’m pretty good and guessing. Having an IQ of 160 myself, and I’ve discussed this at Mensa meetings before, for some reason, people with high IQs are pretty good at detecting others who have high IQs. Anyway, my examples…

High IQ: Former President Barack Obama. For example, the way he gathers all types of information before he processes it to come to a decision is key. Plus he welcomes the opinions and knowledge from others. Obama will dissect the problem or task a

Here are two perfect examples to compare. First, though, I want to mention that I do not know the IQ of the two examples below, but I’m pretty good and guessing. Having an IQ of 160 myself, and I’ve discussed this at Mensa meetings before, for some reason, people with high IQs are pretty good at detecting others who have high IQs. Anyway, my examples…

High IQ: Former President Barack Obama. For example, the way he gathers all types of information before he processes it to come to a decision is key. Plus he welcomes the opinions and knowledge from others. Obama will dissect the problem or task at hand, work through various scenarios and/or outcomes, before he finally makes a decision. If more information comes in after that which sways his decision or opinion, he is not afraid to do so. Same-sex marriage is a perfect example. He was opposed when he first came into office. But through the years, as more information came in, after he talked about this with those people who want to marry their same-sex partner, Obama changed his mind. He decided that same-sex couples have the same rights as hetero couples thus his support for allowing gay-marriage changed.

Low IQ: Usurper Donald Trump. I am not saying this because I loathe this man, I’m saying it because it’s as plain as the nose on his face, or that thing on top of his head he calls his hair… this guy is not the sharpest knife in the drawer. Elevator does not go to the top floor. About as sharp as a marble. Dumber than his mess of hair. I think you get the idea. Naturally he has carried on this he has a “very high IQ,” but that’s to be expected because he has very low self-esteem. His behavior and definitely his vocabulary — or lack of even a high school level vocabulary — scream that he is no more than normal. In fact, I suspect he is slightly under normal. Bullies typically have lower IQs (which does not mean that people with low IQs are bullies), and Trump is a bully. He’s also a psychopath, but that’s another topic. He never reads claiming to have read only one book in his life. I do wonder if he has dyslexia (which has nothing to do with one’s IQ) but won’t admit it. I hear that he gets all his news from the TV. He won’t read over paperwork, which is why he does not attend the morning security brief (or whatever it’s called). If he doesn’t have dyslexia, then his reading skills are very inferior, especially for his age and economic stature.

Now, before anyone asks that if his IQ is average or below, how come he’s so rich and successful? In his case, he had daddy’s money for starters. But it’s his ability to be mean, rude, cold, and calculating to people which helped him on his rise to economic power. He does not care who or what he says about anyone. He will screw people over in a heartbeat if it helps him make more of a profit or rise even more in power. Besides, the meaning of success will vary between people. Sure, he’s monetarily successful, but how he achieved it is not the kind of success I would want. I could never live with myself if my money was gained by screwing people over all over the world. Besides, I’m not entirely sure he’s a rich as he says he his. He has a lot of debt. I think he is quoting his gross numbers… what the value is of all his properties without subtracting debt, overhead, taxes, etc. Sure, all his properties would total well into the billions but back out his debt and I wouldn’t be surprised to see his net value drop into the millions. But, in all honesty, I don’t care how rich he is. I really don’t.

Well, there’s my two-cents-worth.

Lots of people think they’re superior to others.

Lots of people do not.

While there might be more people who scored high on an IQ test who take that to mean they are superior to “everyone” or even most people, compared to people who did not score high on an IQ test, it is not my experience that this is common.

The higher one’s intelligence actually is (regardless of tests) the more someone has the ability to become aware of what they don’t know. In other words, the more people know, the more they feel like there is so much more that they do not know. It’s humbling.

If a very intelligent person hap

Lots of people think they’re superior to others.

Lots of people do not.

While there might be more people who scored high on an IQ test who take that to mean they are superior to “everyone” or even most people, compared to people who did not score high on an IQ test, it is not my experience that this is common.

The higher one’s intelligence actually is (regardless of tests) the more someone has the ability to become aware of what they don’t know. In other words, the more people know, the more they feel like there is so much more that they do not know. It’s humbling.

If a very intelligent person happens to be arrogant, it is easy for others to blame their arrogance on their intelligence. But I’ve met people at nearly all levels of intellect who have the personality flaw of arrogance. It is particularly common amongst popular teenagers, regardless of intellectual ability.

I have noticed people who think that high IQ people act like they are superior.

When very intelligent people enjoy talking about things that most people find esoteric, they encounter people responding to them like they are looking down on others, when all they are doing is talking about something interesting to them.

At a neighborhood party a few years ago, I was talking with some folks, and I don’t even remember the subject—but I do remember I was really enjoying myself. Then one of the people in the conversation said, “Come on, people, this is a party! Why are we talking about this???”

Everyone else seemed fine with her statement, but I felt a bit sad. I was finally in a conversation I enjoyed. I didn’t look down at these people, they were my neighborhood friends. But it is possible they thought I did. Looking back on it, perhaps my friend who changed the subject thought she was doing me a favor? I’ll never know.

So, I really enjoy hanging out with people who like digging into subjects deeply. From the outside, maybe this looks like I’m “looking down on” people who aren’t as smart as I am, when really, I’m feeling ignored or shunned by people who find my speaking style or subject matter obscure.

The subjects I love talking about are wide and varied, but do not include wine, sports, entertainment, or gossip. Talk with me about physics, human behavior, history, science, relationships, your life experience, spirituality, books, politics, religion, technology, civil engineering, neurology, and a thousand other topics that interest me, and I’m having fun!

But I’ve had people actually tell me (or someone near me, who told me) they thought I was looking down on them, because I wasn’t interested in the topics they were interested in.

I have caught myself feeling superior. Hasn’t everyone? I have caught myself feeling entitled. But these are common personal failings, which shows up in humans from any culture, with any intelligence level, at all times in history, as far as I can tell.

Having a high IQ is like having a tall height measurement. It doesn’t make a person more important or better than others. But it does tend to lead to people who don’t happen to have a high IQ or tall height thinking such people act or feel elitist.

People may feel superior due to their nationality, looks, religion, intellect, family, financial situation, university, talent, skin color, job, and on and on. Feeling superior is a kind of arrogance, a kind of narcissism. It doesn’t require any actual “advantage” for a narcissistic person to feel superior to everyone.

When any person feels superior to “everyone” or even “most people” they tend to think they feel that way due to some quality they have. I’ve learned that feeling superior is an equal opportunity personality flaw—all kinds of people may feel that way.

IOThe score probably reflects where they are on a test that can be condensed to a piece of paper or a computer screen. I think it’s likely to be accurate although people can practise now. That didn’t happen once and your first score is the most accurate.

What concerns me is the things that can’t be tested. Highest in importance are communication skills. I’ve worked for many years with students with Asperger Syndrome and whilst they make very good technicians or surgeons they often have little in the way of bedside manner. Many doctors gravitate to surgery to avoid people. They may be excellent

IOThe score probably reflects where they are on a test that can be condensed to a piece of paper or a computer screen. I think it’s likely to be accurate although people can practise now. That didn’t happen once and your first score is the most accurate.

What concerns me is the things that can’t be tested. Highest in importance are communication skills. I’ve worked for many years with students with Asperger Syndrome and whilst they make very good technicians or surgeons they often have little in the way of bedside manner. Many doctors gravitate to surgery to avoid people. They may be excellent surgeons and maybe that’s what matters most, but they may not have the skills necessary to draw out information from patients. I’m not a surgeon but I’ve been on the wrong end of the surgeons knife more than 130 times so I’m drawing my conclusions from direct experience.

If you compare a Gastro surgeon to a Gastroenterologist there is a huge difference in communication. A surgeon doesn’t have to interact to know what the problem is - they have scans and tests for that. I’m being very general here. A gastroenterologist, on the other hand, needs to listen to your symptoms as well as look at your signs of illness. They therefore tend to be very good communicators in order to be effective.

IQ tests don’t test anything outside the four corners of a document. What about Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Intelligences. If we can’t reflect on our actions how do we improve? If we can’t try and understand reactions of others can we function well in society? Some people are really skilled with their hands but they’re not assessed by an IQ test even if they’re self taught. Once people could go through the ranks to become an engineer. Is their learning any less valid? My neighbour did this and when the uni graduates started work he was the one who had to teach them to apply their learning to a different setting.

What about those people who care so much for their environment or have a “green thumb”. Are they any less intelligent than someone who studied horticulture. Go further and look at truly gifted musicians. They may have a gift that is really appreciated but where is that taken into account in an IQ test. It’s not. What about an elite athlete? Don’t they have a gift? Is it assessable in an IQ test? You know the answer.

Self analysis and empathy are often lacking in people with high IQs. Sheldon Cooper’s character has been developed by someone who knows Aspys very well. The character would obviously score well in an IQ test but has trouble functioning and interacting with others. You can have a very high IQ yet not be able communicate or sustain a relationship. An IQ test can’t determine the eight Intelligences identified by Educationists. What’s more important is that an IQ test doesn’t give strategies for improvement whereas a Multiple Intelligences Checklist (MI) (free tests online) has strategies for improvement in areas of weakness and strength. As a teacher I’d prefer to find strengths in students with little self confidence and develop programs for their weaknesses and to consolidate their strengths. An IQ test is stagnant in that once you’ve got the score there is no follow through. I see little point in an IQ test when half the people are going to be under the average. The people who value them most are the people who do well.

In answer to your question yes they do have a high IQ. What drags them down overall is likely to be the aspects that can’t be tested within the confines of the IQ test or by pen and paper. Someone with a high IQ may be let down by poor communication, a lack of self reflection and empathy, and musical or bodily intelligence to name a few. An IQ test is not well rounded, although the strongest supporters of them are the ones who do very well. Why wouldn’t they like that? Overall, the aspects that can’t be tested in an IQ test are the ones that let them down and often reduce overall intelligence. However, they are very unlikely to accept that.

Most of all it can’t test whether a person is honest, whether they have empathy or on any spiritual or self-actualisation thinking. The problem is that creative thinking and empathy are more noticeable in their absence than their presence - and therefore impossible to test in an IQ test, or almost any test for that matter.

A very good question!

TL:DR version:

High IQ is often associated with a large, well informed working memory and faster mental processing times on complicated or convoluted concepts…

Someone who formulates complicated ideas, or presents solutions to complicated issues, rapidly and with unusually strong specificity and confidence, is often perceived as flippant, arrogant and/or condescending.

Longer version:

Anybody can be arrogant, usually because they think more of themselves than reality supports.

However, people with high IQ are often perceived as arrogant even when they aren't “full of themselves”.

Imagine this: you c

TL:DR version:

High IQ is often associated with a large, well informed working memory and faster mental processing times on complicated or convoluted concepts…

Someone who formulates complicated ideas, or presents solutions to complicated issues, rapidly and with unusually strong specificity and confidence, is often perceived as flippant, arrogant and/or condescending.

Longer version:

Anybody can be arrogant, usually because they think more of themselves than reality supports.

However, people with high IQ are often perceived as arrogant even when they aren't “full of themselves”.

Imagine this: you call a friend and they answer their phone and then say “I’m so glad you called, I can't find my phone, do you know where I left it?”

Your response to this is going to include some level of sarcasm since it is an obvious question.

For years I thought I was providing obvious observations or ideas and couldn't understand why everyone thought I was arrogant and condescending or “talking down to them”.

I knew I was smart, but had no concept of how big a gap there was until I was in graduate school for counseling and one of my professors explained that my Graduate entrance exam (the MAT) indicated an IQ of 155.

I have since learned to present ideas and especially observations as significant realizations or I insert a qualifier (“if I remember correctly…”) rather than presenting a flippant statement that makes it seem like I’m dismissing them or their situation as stupid and “simple”. Or even harder to do, when I feel like correcting someone who is “almost right”, I just keep my mouth shut. My comment might add clarity to the topic, but usually kills the conversation, not exactly a net benefit.

Those changes made a huge difference in how people see me socially.

It also keeps people open to asking for my input when they actually want get clarification on something, especially in topics where I have an acknowledged expertise. When I correct something a coworker is saying or doing (as a supervisor) they generally appreciate the input because they have learned to trust that I only jump in uninvited if it is truly important. If the point sounds mundane, I clarify why it was important enough to correct. (“I know it sounds like splitting hairs, but that was the basis for the lawsuit filed against [one of our coworkers] last year.”)

And that is probably much more of an answer than anyone wanted to read…

In general, yes that is likely true. While this obviously can’t be generalized for all individuals, I have found that many high IQ individuals absolutely despise pettiness and drama. They believe it is a complete waste of time, and they can see that simply addressing the problem would make everyone’s lives so much better. In this situation, they would likely be blunt in order to address the problem as quickly and efficiently as possible.

However, this bluntness doesn’t necessarily translate to all scenarios. As many wish to avoid drama, certain high IQ individuals may be compelled to avoid givi

In general, yes that is likely true. While this obviously can’t be generalized for all individuals, I have found that many high IQ individuals absolutely despise pettiness and drama. They believe it is a complete waste of time, and they can see that simply addressing the problem would make everyone’s lives so much better. In this situation, they would likely be blunt in order to address the problem as quickly and efficiently as possible.

However, this bluntness doesn’t necessarily translate to all scenarios. As many wish to avoid drama, certain high IQ individuals may be compelled to avoid giving direct and blunt answers if they are able to discern that these answers would cause more harm than good to the relationship.

Hope this helps!

Infuriated? No. However, their lack of ability to interest me in any way and their overall predictability makes me not want to associate myself with them on a level more than common work interactions. I believe the lowest IQ of anyone who I am friends with is 110. He unironically tells me I'm the smartest person he has ever met (which is quite strange, but ok). I typically list off a few people in our old class who have IQs of 145+ who I say are more intelligent than me. One specifically who has an IQ of over 160 He got a perfect score on the act and sat while taking a nap during the tests and

Infuriated? No. However, their lack of ability to interest me in any way and their overall predictability makes me not want to associate myself with them on a level more than common work interactions. I believe the lowest IQ of anyone who I am friends with is 110. He unironically tells me I'm the smartest person he has ever met (which is quite strange, but ok). I typically list off a few people in our old class who have IQs of 145+ who I say are more intelligent than me. One specifically who has an IQ of over 160 He got a perfect score on the act and sat while taking a nap during the tests and making animal noises. My friend begrudgingly agrees after I present the argument that the other student is in fact more intelligent than me. The most hilarious thing is: no one realized he was that intelligent before the scores were released… except me. The students brother won the national merit scholarship and was admitted into every school he applied to, including every Ivy League college.

There are people who are smarter than legends like Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein, but why do you not see them making new discoveries or new inventions or solving equations that no one could?

TLDR: IQ is not the only measure of intelligence.

People have different strengths in different tasks, and thus have different types of IQs. A familiarity of domain also plays a huge role.

“Familiarity of Domain” is a concept that people who deal with a task more often, become more intelligent in that task with time. They start to memorise patterns and learn how to discover new ones using the existing. This

There are people who are smarter than legends like Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein, but why do you not see them making new discoveries or new inventions or solving equations that no one could?

TLDR: IQ is not the only measure of intelligence.

People have different strengths in different tasks, and thus have different types of IQs. A familiarity of domain also plays a huge role.

“Familiarity of Domain” is a concept that people who deal with a task more often, become more intelligent in that task with time. They start to memorise patterns and learn how to discover new ones using the existing. This is the reason why the most IQ gifted person in the world is not a scientist or a PhD holder, because they have no familiarity but have the mental power needed for it.

There are people who are smarter than legends like Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein, but why do you not see them making new discoveries or new inventions or solving equations that no one could?

The answer is linked to how we measure “intelligence” and how crude is this method.

We like to think IQ determines the intelligence of a person. However it is not true. People, as I mentioned, can be better/more intelligent at a task than those who are better than them at some other tasks.

This is where we should define intelligence more clearly.

The quotient determined by “IQ” tests only gives us a measure of the ability of abstract/random thinking, because of the very nature of the test. There are also emotional intelligence quotients, sometimes asserted as just emotional quotients. They measure your emotional stability. And similarly, for every task we can define its own test of one’s intelligence quotient.

So, you best bet is, stop hoarding mental power and start to use it on the world.